Stove Designs

Gustavo Peña, June, 2010

Buenos dias aqui te mando información sobre mis modelos, el primer modelo que elaboramos fue con la colaboración directa del Dr. e Ingeniero Larry Winiarski diseñador de la cámara de combustión Rocket, el Ing. Winiarski es muy conocido entre los que trabajamos con estufas ecológicas, puedes buscar los 10 principios de la combustión en internét, el problema que algunos de los que nos apasiona trabajar en el tema, no respetamos ni la mitad de estos pricipios y el resultado es catastrófica, hay muchas estufas no solo en mi país el salvador sino en el mundo entero que tienen una apariencia muy bonita, pero solo es maquillaje y lo peór de todo es que muchas organizaciones las construyen porque es mas un negocio para sus organizaciones que beneficio a la salud y al medio ambiente, gracias a los conocimientos del Ing. Winiarski a su ayuda personal y al apoyo financiero de StoveTeam International www.stoveteam.org he logrado desarrollar varios modelos que puedes ver en youtube aqui te mando los link y si necesitas mas información con gusto se las proporcionaré. Aquí te mando también el último modelo que acabo de desarrollar es la Ecko3 (por los tres quemadores) y los resultados de laboratorio de la cámara de combustión rocket

ecocina y salud el salvador
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6Q_j2S1KUg

ecocia paso a paso
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fmp23SdS2Y

reportaje en un canal americano
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STt1I8gRkp0

cocina escolar
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AFq0PbYQcM

conina de 2 quemadores
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IyVcH0FH_0

Marc Pare, June, 2010

Three friends and I spent last semester at Georgia Tech working on the thermodynamic modeling (and optimization) of cook stoves... I attached a summary of our project and the meat of the analysis section and the Full Report (see the attachments)


TOWARD END-TO-END IMPROVED COOK STOVE OPTIMIZATION

By Marc-Antoine Paré, Matt Redmond, Christopher Beebe, and Nick Kretschmar

While it is possible to build and test the performance of prototype Improved Cook
Stoves without significant capital investment, if the amount of time that it takes to
optimize candidate stove designs could be drastically reduced, then cook stove
technology could reach the hands of many more in developing nations. It was identified
that an end-to-end modeling and optimization effort for Improved Cook Stove (ICS)
design could aid in the development of more efficient and cleaner-burning stoves. The
thermodynamic and heat transfer processes underlying cook stove performance are
tightly coupled, which makes modeling a challenge. The following analysis is a first
attempt at capturing each of the underlying processes of stove performance. The model is
formulated so as to facilitate the optimization of stove geometry. This effort helps
pinpoint the deficiencies of the current state of stove modeling and attempts to
demonstrate the eventual power of a predictive stove model.

Art Donnelly, SeaChar.Org June, 2010

It was not quite 9 months ago, when I sent out an email to a small group of collaborators, with a Subject line that asked the question: "How do we get biochar stoves to Central America?" Of course, like the punch line to the old vaudeville joke, the answer is "lots of hard work". I could not have imagined 9 months ago was how rewarding all that work would feel. I want to share that feeling with all of you.

I recently returned to Seattle from Costa Rica's famed coffee producing area the Santos Zone. This was my second trip since mid- January. I have been continuing my work as a technical consultant to a clean stove/biochar project. Proyecto Estufa Finca (Farm Stove) was initiated by organic coffee farmer Arturo Segura http://www.solcolibri.com/ and the members of the local citizens group APORTES.

Jock Gill, May 2010

With one can: I can make a stove I can cook a meal I can make biochar I can be carbon negative I can start to change the world

This iCan is made from a 7" tall pineapple juice canThis iCan is made from a 7" tall pineapple juice can

I took a 7" tall pineapple juice can, removed the contents, and then marked it thusly:

1. A line around the can 1/3 from the bottom --- this is the top of the fuel load

2. A line around the can 1/3 from the top -- this is the line for the secondary air holes

The middle section is for the wood gas buffer to insure pyrolysis, not combustion.

Next

Primary air supply for a 7" tall pineapple juice canPrimary air supply for a 7" tall pineapple juice can

Marked the bottom of the can off into 8 equal sections. I then used a nail set to make 8 equally spaced holes about half way between the outside of the can and its center. I made a 9th hole in the center. Not too big -- about 1/2 way down the small nail set shaft.

Then I used the line1/3 down from the top to locate the secondary air holes.
I made 8 equally spaced holes with the small nail punch and then used the the biggest punch to enlarge the holes to the full width of its shaft.

At this point I removed the top of the can completely. I left it on for the best structural integrity while I was punching holes.

Done. The All-in-One TLUD is complete. Very simple. Just 17 holes in the right places in one can.

More pictures, are also available at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jockgill/sets/72157624142002304/
and click here for more story details: http://www.bioenergylists.org/node/2827

From Stuart Conway and Rogerio Miranda

Hola companeros,

Mandanadose un reporte algo grande, pero de interes sobre el trabajo que hice Rogerio y Winrock introduciendo una estufa tipo Justa pero modificado para Peru, la Inkawasi

Download the Complete Report PERU HEALTHY KITCHEN_HEALTHY STOVE PILOT PROJECT

From Stuart Conway and Rogerio Miranda

Hola companeros,

Mandanadose un reporte algo grande, pero de interes sobre el trabajo que hice Rogerio y Winrock introduciendo una estufa tipo Justa pero modificado para Peru, la Inkawasi

Download the Complete Report PERU HEALTHY KITCHEN_HEALTHY STOVE PILOT PROJECT

Testing of the Anila stove in Cambodia 03.05.2010
Sarah Carter and Vichida Tan, UK Biochar Research Centre

See http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-andersons-tl for a similar test on Anderson's TLUD, and http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-everythingni for testing of EverythingNice stove.

A charcoal oven in the kitchen of the Karen Blixen Camp, Maasai Mara.

They use it because it;
a) saves alot of money on buying LPG (fossil fuel)
b) cooks food really really well!

And it only uses a handfull of charcoal thanks to insulation and the ceramic liner!

to buy one please see

www.kenyacharcoal.blogspot.com

we also offer international shipping

Testing of the Anderson TLUD in Cambodia 27.04.2010
Sarah Carter and Vichida Tan, UK Biochar Research Centre

Similar tests have been carried out on the Anila http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-anila-stove and EverythingNice stoves http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-everythingni.

Paul Olivier, April 2010

Today we put in operation for the first time the 250 gasifier with a stove top.
This gasifier has a single 2-inch pipe that vents housing air to a warmer grate.
This pipe had no butterfly valve or other restriction.
We used the same small 80x80 mm fan as in the 150 gasifier.
This fan had no problem at all supplying air to the reactor and to the 2-inch pipe.
The burn lasted almost an hour on rice hulls, even though the height of the reactor was no more than 70 cm, the same height as in the case of the 150 stove.
The warmer grate had sufficient heat from the housing to fry an egg, as indicated in picture 855.
We obtained a bright blue flame, as shown in picture 865,
although the camera did not have the right lighting to display it properly.
The stove top was not properly reinforced when a large pot filled with water was placed on top.
There was a deflection of a few mm's.
However this can be easily remedied with two more lateral braces underneath the stove top.
In conclusion, the 250 gasifier works well and delivers an enormous amount of heat.

[MAGH 3G]( http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/ ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of GoodPlanet.org This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO http://www.e-geo.org http://www.goodstove.com/ . For more details visit http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/

[MAGH 3G]( http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/ ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of GoodPlanet.org This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO http://www.e-geo.org http://www.goodstove.com/ . For more details visit http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/

[MAGH 3G]( http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/ ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of GoodPlanet.org This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO http://www.e-geo.org http://www.goodstove.com/ . For more details visit http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/

[MAGH 3G]( http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/ ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of GoodPlanet.org This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO http://www.e-geo.org http://www.goodstove.com/ . For more details visit http://e-magh3g.blogspot.com/

TLUD Vesto Grasifier
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, Swaziland, April 2, 2010


Dear Roger and TLUD Fans (the other kind)

The new and inproved firewood space heater from Musaki Enterprises Kenya,

Utilize radiant heat wisely. these space heater get very hot,

Maximum Preformance, Maximum Output, Minimal Fuss

Andrew Ma, March 11, 2010

Minimalist, most accessible and, lightest wood gas stove I've seen or built so far. (But got a few more ideas). Credit goes to WorldStove and its Everything Nice Stove design.

Instructions

Report on TLUD Discussions at the 2010 ETHOS conference
By Christa Roth and Kelpie Wilson
Submitted 8 March 2010

There was a good showing of TLUD technology at the annual ETHOS Stoves conference in Kirkland, WA, USA on January 29-31, 2010. This report covers some of the discussions about TLUDs that took place at conference sessions.

Dr. Paul Anderson, a.k.a., “Dr. TLUD”, made the pitch for TLUDs and biochar throughout the conference. He brought a large collection of 20 different TLUDs. Most were simple homemade devices made from “tincanium” (Dr. Anderson’s Friday evening presentation on the wonders of “tincanium” was delightfully humorous). TLUD designers Art Donnelly, Christa Roth, and Hugh McLaughlin all had stoves on display. Anderson had one example of a mass produced TLUD that is manufactured in India.

About 30 people attended the TLUD community discussion session. To get an overview and discover who had which type of specific interest, the participants were asked to raise hands on which aspects of application of the TLUD principles they were interested in. The following aspects were identified:

* Applications: is the main focus on cooking, biochar, or a combination of both?
* What are appropriate sizes? TLUDs exist for 2 cups, 2 liters, 5 l, 20 l up to 5 gallon, 20 gallon, 55 gallon. The interest in producing biochar is driving design of larger TLUDs.
* Natural draft or forced air. If using forced air, what are the implications of different power sources: grid, Thermo Electric Generator (TEG), battery based electricity
* Emissions (indoor, outdoor, any)
* Fuels (types of fuels, sizes and densities)
* Locations (which continent, urban, peri-urban, rural environments)
* Materials for TLUDs (ceramics, metal)
* What price range is acceptable? (developed country, developing countries)
* What can we as individuals and organizations do to advance TLUD technology?
* What are the future prospects of TLUD technology?

Participants at the TLUD session participants made a list of TLUD features as compared to other stove types such as the rocket stove:

* Makes biochar
* Starts fast, boils water very quickly, and burns a long time on one load of fuel
* Less attention required for fuel input (no continuous stoking of the fuel needed), increasing freedom for the operator/cook
* Fuel flexible – uses small size waste that cannot be burned in other stoves
* Cleaner than other kinds of stoves, with low Black Carbon (BC), Organic Carbon (OC) and CO
* Variety of scales and applications from cooking to metal forging, including barbecue, grilling, frying, heating, lighting
* Lightweight, portable and modular; can use multiple units to control heat output
* Easy and cheap to build from tin cans or sheet steel. Dimensional tolerances are not stringent
* Low temperature operation. Pyrolysis temperatures are below 500 degrees C, resulting in less combustion chamber burnout
* Suitable for fireplaces that are not allowed to burn open fires any longer
* Safe for indoor space heating with flue exhaust
* Can be an inexpensive add-on to existing stoves for specialized applications (e.g. water kettle in addition to a plancha stove) and to take advantage of small sized fuels not suitable for a rocket stove

A few TLUD problems/challenges were also identified:

* Lack of turndown ratio
* Lack of emissions robustness. More emissions on startup and sometimes on shut down.
* Changing fuel form factor when adding new fuel can cause stalling.

The group discussed in detail the following ideas for advancing TLUD development:

**Materials:** light-weight ceramics are not necessarily needed for insulation of the combustion chamber, unlike in a rocket stove, as for TLUDs the temperature in the fuel bed stays at ambient temperature until the pyrolysis front passes through. Then temperatures get higher. The open flames are not within the combustion chamber but above the fuel bed. The hottest parts of a TLUD stove are the concentrator disk and the bottom of the fire chamber, where the remaining charcoal might be burnt creating high temperatures (if the char is not dumped out and conserved for other use e.g. as biochar). Ceramics are cheap to fabricate, e.g. consumable stove components like the concentrator disk or the bottom plate of the fire chamber. Options for modular stove designs containing ceramic parts to be explored further. A huge gap between standard pottery and industrial ceramics was noted.

**Production and Dissemination:** Stoves should come as a kit: combustion chamber + pot stand/application + snuffer box for the char to be saved.

**Economics of charcoal:** The saving of char could become more popular if the produced charcoal were attributed more value (carbon offsets for biochar used in the soil, charcoal fines to be processed into charcoal briquettes, water filters etc.)

**Modular advantages:** TLUDs excel on high power output, e.g. boiling water, but don’t turn down the power so well. The concept of having a different and/or smaller combustion unit for the simmering stage or replacing the continuous heat addition with a retained heat cooker should be explored further. Modular systems could use a number of TLUD burners under a large pot or grill. If cooking lasts a long time, such as firing a grill at a restaurant, you could replace spent TLUDs with new ones to keep the heat going while you recharge spent TLUD’s with new fuel.

Despite the advantages of the TLUD there are very few stove programs using TLUDs. Here are the ones we know about:

* The BP Oorja stove, now called FirstEnergy, distributed 400,000 units in India, but there exists little feedback on the campaign.
* Phillips had a TLUD stove and planned a major roll-out in India to start late 2009, but no up-to-date info is available.
* Nathaniel Mulcahy of World Stove is manufacturing institutional and household size stoves in Haiti (uses a pyrolytic gasifier technology similar to TLUD); allegedly building over 100 units per day with plans to upscale and add a fuel production unit for grass pellets. This is a very interesting project in the limelight, with high potential to create worldwide awareness. To be observed.

Other than those listed above, there are no projects yet at a major scale. Participants observed that this was a ‘chicken-and-egg’ scenario: Donors only want to roll out ‘already proven technologies’ but nobody apart from major companies like BP or Phillips has the money to do the research needed to prove the technologies. Funding is needed for research to get the combustion chamber to the application stage and to collect user feedback on a major scale.

The group felt there was a strong need to get more experience on the ground building and cooking on TLUDs. In Uganda this year a TLUD-project with World Bank funding will start. Funding has been secured for 2 years. More projects are needed.

What participants committed to do:

* Cook on a TLUD. Several people have been making TLUDs, but very few have been cooking on them. Some people volunteered to use a TLUD for cooking for a given time, like a month, and blog about the experience. More volunteers are needed to do this.
* Create awareness and knowledge about TLUDS.
* Paul Anderson committed to put a TLUD handbook on the web.

Upcoming TLUD events include a Combined Heat and Biochar event in Massachusetts on 9-13 August (contact Paul Anderson for more details) and the annual Stove Camp at Aprovecho, 26 to 30 July. Dean Still, organizer of the Aprovecho Stove Camp has said the camp will focus on the TLUD this year.

Jock Gill, March 2010

Here I show the 4th can used in the P80 design. It is a 1 quart paint can.
I believe the holes are unnecessary and will try a new can tomorrow. This
can acts to collect and focus the thermal energy in a 3" diameter column.
Works very well.

Can #1 is the 3 lbs Costco burn pot with 4 lbs of softwood pellets.

Can #2 is Weber charcoal chimney used, in this case, to make charcoal, not
burn it.

Can #3 is the second Costco can that will go around the the focusing can an
support the "gas drip pan" and gas grate.

So the p80 design has two inner cans and two outer cans. The outer cans stay
relatively cool and help keep the heat in the system.

Read more, with pictures

Holey Roket: A Biomass Briquette Stove
Rok Oblak, Slovenia, June 2009

See Rok Stoves
and Fuel Briquette Burning at Stoves Camp 2008

The Holey Roket technology promotes using biomass briquettes and their hole as the key feature of an efficient cooking system. The flames coming in the combustion chamber are condensed within a small space (scheme) providing higher heat output and therefore better combustion of toxic gasses like Carbon Monoxide (CO).

Jock Gill, Pellet Futures / Biochar NE Medford, MA March 4, 2010

Jock has been adding to this design, for the most recent updates see: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jockgill/

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Roger Samson, February 2010

Please click Read More for a set of photos showing the construction of a prototype 125 mm diameter Grasifier Stove burning Switchgrass Pellets provided by Roger Samson (REAP-Canada).

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Roger Samson, February 2010

Please click Read More for a set of photos showing the construction of a prototype 125 mm diameter Grasifier Stove burning Switchgrass Pellets provided by Roger Samson (REAP-Canada).

Paul Anderson, February 21, 2010

For the first time at one Internet location, the basics of "Top-Lit UpDraft" (TLUD) micro-gasification are available along with numerous links to source documents. This "TLUD Handbook" is a "draft for
discussion" and this is the 2010 copy of the Handbook.

Paul

Paul S Anderson, Ph.D. -- aka Dr. TLUD ("Dr. Tee-lud")
Biomass Energy Consultant with BEF, & Partner in Chip Energy.
Specialist in micro-gasification.
Office & Res: 309-452-7072
www.chipenergy.com
http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/andersontludconstruction

File attachments: 

Paul Anderson, February 21, 2010

For the first time at one Internet location, the basics of "Top-Lit UpDraft" (TLUD) micro-gasification are available along with numerous links to source documents. This "TLUD Handbook" is a "draft for
discussion" and this is the 2010 copy of the Handbook.

Paul

Paul S Anderson, Ph.D. -- aka Dr. TLUD ("Dr. Tee-lud")
Biomass Energy Consultant with BEF, & Partner in Chip Energy.
Specialist in micro-gasification.
Office & Res: 309-452-7072
www.chipenergy.com
http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/andersontludconstruction

File attachments: 

From Willie to Richard: A Family of Tincanium Stoves
Paul Anderson,Hugh McLaughlin

A Power Point Presentation presented at the 2010 ETHOS Conference. It is a bit "tongue in cheek."

Enjoy!

Paul
--Paul S Anderson, Ph.D. -- aka Dr. TLUD ("Dr. Tee-lud")
Biomass Energy Consultant with BEF, & Partner in Chip Energy.
Specialist in micro-gasification.
Office & Res: 309-452-7072

Dale Andreatta, Ph.D., P.E. and Alex Wohlgemuth, January 2010

An Investigation of Skirts

Predicted heat transfer to various surfaces of the pot with a 10mm steel skirtPredicted heat transfer to various surfaces of the pot with a 10mm steel skirt

Dale Andreatta, Ph.D., P.E. and Alex Wohlgemuth, January 2010

An Investigation of Skirts

Predicted heat transfer to various surfaces of the pot with a 10mm steel skirtPredicted heat transfer to various surfaces of the pot with a 10mm steel skirt

Paal Wendelobo, January 2010

Attached you will find a prospect of the new TLUD called MUS (multi use stove).

MUS The multi-use stove.

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Roger Samson, January 2010

GrasifierGrasifier

Roger Samson was here tonight and we made and tested a Grasifier: a Switchgrass burning stove based on the dimensions of the Vesto adapted to make a lower cost pellet burning stove for Haiti.

Power, 2.5 kw
Burn rate 8-10 g/min
Mass 550 g
Fuel load 600 g though it can hold 750

Lighted with two caps of paint thinners
The flame went completely blue (just before the end) then wobbled a lot and went out.
When it went out there was no smoke indicating there were no volatiles left.

Time to fabricate, about 30 minutes.

I see this as a burner that can be attached to the centre of a Haitian charcoal stove to convert it into very clean burning a pellet stove.

Char yield: 25% of the initial dry mass.
Moisture content of the initial fuel, about 7%

Ash: nearly none.

Regards
Crispin

Fuel, Stoves and Water for Haiti
January 27, 2009

There are several projects to supply fuel, stoves and potable water to Haiti. Some have been been ongoing since before the quake and some. The organizations we know of are:

CHF International, Helps (Water Purifier)
To donate a $35 water purifying system, go to https://secure.helpsintl.org/store/haiti.php

Legacy Foundation (Fuel Briquettes)

Miombo, Project Haiti www.prohaiti.org
Peko Pe TLUD pellet fueled stoves to be distributed by Project Haiti. Pellets from Georgia.

Trees, Water, People TWP
Ananda Marga Universal Relief Team AMURT http://www.amurthaiti.org/ and
Recho Rocket stove made from mud formed in a bucket, the Haiti Rocket Stove
Stovetec Rocket Stoves in a metal bucket.

World Stove, International Lifeline Fund
Biucci, Everything Nice TLUD stoves fabricated in Haiti. Pellet fuel from Florida (Green Circle). Grass pellets to be made in Haiti.

Fuel, Stoves and Water for Haiti
January 27, 2009

There are several projects to supply fuel, stoves and potable water to Haiti. Some have been been ongoing since before the quake and some. The organizations we know of are:

CHF International, Helps (Water Purifier)
To donate a $35 water purifying system, go to https://secure.helpsintl.org/store/haiti.php

Legacy Foundation (Fuel Briquettes)

Miombo, Project Haiti www.prohaiti.org
Peko Pe TLUD pellet fueled stoves to be distributed by Project Haiti. Pellets from Georgia.

Trees, Water, People TWP
Ananda Marga Universal Relief Team AMURT http://www.amurthaiti.org/ and
Recho Rocket stove made from mud formed in a bucket, the Haiti Rocket Stove
Stovetec Rocket Stoves in a metal bucket.

World Stove, International Lifeline Fund
Biucci, Everything Nice TLUD stoves fabricated in Haiti. Pellet fuel from Florida (Green Circle). Grass pellets to be made in Haiti.

Fuel, Stoves and Water for Haiti
January 27, 2009

There are several projects to supply fuel, stoves and potable water to Haiti. Some have been been ongoing since before the quake and some. The organizations we know of are:

CHF International, Helps (Water Purifier)
To donate a $35 water purifying system, go to https://secure.helpsintl.org/store/haiti.php

Legacy Foundation (Fuel Briquettes)

Miombo, Project Haiti www.prohaiti.org
Peko Pe TLUD pellet fueled stoves to be distributed by Project Haiti. Pellets from Georgia.

Trees, Water, People TWP
Ananda Marga Universal Relief Team AMURT http://www.amurthaiti.org/ and
Recho Rocket stove made from mud formed in a bucket, the Haiti Rocket Stove
Stovetec Rocket Stoves in a metal bucket.

World Stove, International Lifeline Fund
Biucci, Everything Nice TLUD stoves fabricated in Haiti. Pellet fuel from Florida (Green Circle). Grass pellets to be made in Haiti.

Andrew Ma, January 2010

My favorite method in is to use trailgear555's stick method:

Since my skewer sticks are rather thin and it is below freezing, I spread pieces from a crunched tea light candle at the bottom to ensure a single match lighting.
Skewers are bone dry so it works well by placing the sticks on the can first and just light the top of the pile.

Video from my experiment:

Otto Formo, January 2010

Clean burning PekoPe 2009Clean burning PekoPe 2009

The Peko Pe is an easy to built, top lit, natural draft (no fan) gasifying stove that burns biomass completely (low to no ash or char). It is

  • Efficient: easy to light, easy to handle, cooks quickly at high temperature.
  • Complete combustion no smoke and no soot
  • Flexible Covering all needs of energy for all types of household and institutional kitchen and other activities like take away food, bakery etc.
  • Simple Not intimidating technology.

The Peko Pe

The Energy Unit, single also called Peko Pe is designed to cover the general basic need for energy, but can be manufactured both smaller and bigger.

The combustion chamber is the heart of the system, and from there the heat will be consentrated up under the pot. The Energy Unit can be used both for cooking and for heating. Single, as a cooking or heating stove, it will cover the basic needs of energy for smaller household. More units put together will cover the need of energy for bigger houshold, institutional kitchen and pots of any size.

Boiling water Boiling water

Boiling testBoiling test

The fuel
Any kind of dry combustible biomass can be used as fuel.

The fire has complete combustion; is High temperature. No smoke. No soot. Some tar under the pan. Sensitive to wind

The usage
It is New technology and requires some training, but it is Easy to use; Flexible; Fits all types of kitchen utensils; and transmits No heat to the sides.

For more information, take a look at the Peko Pe web site: http://www.pekope.net/stove.html
and also the Miomio site: http://www.miombo.no/

Paal Wendelobo, January 2010

What I feel is strongly needed by NGO's and others dealing with Household Energy for Developing Countries; is a list of about top10 actual fuels to be used and top 10 actual types of stoves to be used.

Wood

Nathaniel Mulcahy, January 2010

Attached are the photos of Mr. Ronald Watts' version of our EverythingNice Stove. A version of which we are now rushing for the Haitian relief efforts to provide clean water. More later

yours, Nat

--
Dear Nathaniel

Here a a few photos from the successful construction and operation of the stove. Because I had no suitable vessels, I built them from sheet steel. It operates quite well, and is a good prototype for a larger model

Many thanks
Ronald Watts

Bjarne Laustsen, January 2010, update November, 2010

Jiko Mbono is Swahili for Jatropha Stove.

This is an early version of the stove, it is now using That stove was an early prototype. It is no longer using whole seeds but instead pellets made from the pulp left over after the pressing of jatropha oil, although there is only one pelletization facility for this in Tanzania and no distribution arrangements. Now only, the Jiko Safi uses whole seeds.
The idea is to plant jatropha as a hedge around land holdings. Animals won’t eat it and around an average holding it produces enough seed for a family’s annual fuel needs. I agree that planting it as a crop isn’t ideal

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Jiko Mbono was developed for burning whole Jatropha seeds.
The stove is a TLUD (Top-Lit UpDraft) gasification stove with natural draft air supply.

Earlier development of Jatropha stoves have mainly been based on the use of Jatropha oil. But the use of Jatropha oil in stoves have had some problems. In wick stoves the problem have been on the high viscosity of the oil which makes it difficult to climb wick to feed the flame, this has caused the wick material to burn. Jatropha pressurised stoves have also the problems of keeping the nozzles clean, and also the complicated design which tends to make the stoves relative expensive.

I therefore got the idea to burn the seeds directly in the stove. If the gasification process could provide the heat in the stove to vaporize out the oil from the seeds in the form of gasses, that will save us the work of first mechanically pressing the oil out of the seeds.

I therefore started some experimentation with some simple stove design, and these first experiments showed that it was possible to burn the whole seeds in a stove. Further developments was however needed to get an efficient and user friendly design of the stove.

I contacted Dr. Hassan M. Rajabu from College of Engineering & Technology at University of Dar es Salaam so that we could further develop the stove and test the stove after each modification. In this development we have received valuable economical support from the US based organisation Partners for Development and also support from Pamoja INC. Engineer F. Lauwo from Tanzania Engineering and Manufacturing Design Organisation (TEMDO) have provided assistance in producing the prototypes of the stoves.


Diagram of Jiko Mbono.

The fire in the stove is normally started by having a few crushed seeds that are soaked in methylated spirit or kerosene. These crushed seeds are placed at the top of other seeds in the fuelbox and the fire is lit in these crushed seeds.
The initial process can be started inside the stove or outside. When some seeds at the top got good flames (3-5 minutes) the fuelbox is then placed on the shelve at the bottom of the stove door and the door is closed so the fuelbox get into its position in the centre of the stove. In this initial phase the primary air is kept fully open.

The pyrolysis of the seeds by supply of primary air will gradually build up and the gasses from the pyrolysis will raise by the draft from the stoves internal chimney and be burned at the top by mixing with the secondary air.

During this gradually build up of heat the primary air supply need to be reduced such that enough secondary air can be supplied to allow for a good combustion of the gasses.

The burning of the Jatropha seeds is undertaken in batch portions. After all the seeds in the fuelbox have been pyrolysis the fuelbox need to be taken out and refilled for a new burning. It is not possible at this stage of the development of the stove to refill the fuelbox when the stove is operating, such refilling will just results in heavy smoke.

With a full load of fuel 300 – 400 gram of Jatropha seeds the stove can burn for 1 to 1½ hour when used in real cooking where the fire is somehow turned down. During test we have recorded specific fuel consumption on around 52 gram seeds per liter of boiling water, and an energy efficiency around 44%. However, the high efficiency is atributed to the design of the top part of the stove where the top is inserted in a skirt.

When operated properly the carbon in the seeds will remain as some kind of charcoal.

The use of renewable fuel is important here in Tanzania, where most of the biomass fuels are harvested in natural forests which takes year to re-grow.
We have estimated that a household having 200 – 300 meters of hedges of Jatropha trees will be able to meet their own need of fuel for the household cooking. Jatropha is often planted as hedges, it is a good hedge plant, as it is not browsed by goats, cows or other animals. Also as a hedge plant it does not compete with food crops on cultivating areas.

For urban households in Tanzania Jatropha is a viable alternative to charcoal. A farmer here gets 150 Tsh for one kg of Jatropha seeds (exchange rate 1350 to $). In town the Jatropha seeds will sell for around 300 sh. An urban household will need around 2 kg seeds per day to meet their energy need for cooking, that gives a monthly energy bill of 18,000 sh. If the same households are using charcoal it will on average consume 3 bags of 30 kg charcoal of a price of not less than 15,000 sh, this gives a monthly energy bill of minimum 45,000 sh. The use of Jatropha will in this way represent a good saving and alternative to fuelwood and charcoal.

Other seeds and crop wates can also be used in the stove. We know that seeds from the Croton tree burns well so does Castor seeds. We have also tried and found that the shells from cashew nut burn well in the stove. These shells are mainly a waste product from small-scale Cashew nut processing plants which are scattered in regions growing cashew trees.. We also believe that other seeds such as the oil palm kernel could also burn well when cracked a little. There will likely be many other oil holding seeds that could be used in such a stove.

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