Briquette Stove

A small cafe on the edge of the maasai mara reserve in S.W Kenya that have switched to Cookswell Ovens, they bake about 80 loaves of bread a day along with cupcakes and then roast chicken and meat. per day they use appx 6kgs of charcoal for ALL the cooking. they also use a No 14 KCJ for boiling and frying needs.

6 people are now employed in a almost smokeless kitchen, before they bought a jiko, all thier cooking was done on a 3 stone fire and they used about 25kgs of firewood.

Cook, save money, eat well.

Cookswell Ovens

[MAGH 3G]( ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO . For more details visit

GEO fuel briquettes

is a very low cost technology, and also for making briquettes with very less effort. This is screw based system, requires very less energy and space to operate. Briquettes can be made using human power, convenient for young or old in making briquettes from various types of waste material. Small pieces of waste papers, sawdust, leaves, wood shavings, rice husk, etc. can be used as raw material. Any sticky material available in abundant can also be added if required for producing compact and strong briquettes. The cost of each such device made up of iron is less than $8 (USD) or Rs. 400. Various types of stoves are available for using the briquettes, including some of these AVAN and MAGH series stoves can be used. Magh-1 stove with little adoption can also be used for briquettes as fuel. We can also make and use special stoves for the briquettes as fuel. For more details see:

Also see | |

Fuel Briquette Burning at Stoves Camp 2008
Rok Oblak, August 31, 2008
Briquette Burning StoveBriquette Burning Stove

Stove DiagramStove Diagram

This prototype was to check the hole of the briquette and how gasification can do a nice job. As said, starting the fire with few small sticks and then after preheating the chamber, briquettes ignite by themselves and burn throughly. You can help flames with having a stick in the hole while burning. I really liked how the briquette retained its shape after it burned out, so you could still push the next one it without preventing the draft..

But the briquette burned with the surface lit from the combustion chamber, as Larry predicted. You could literally walk away of the stove with the consistent flame going on all the time (I guess the briquettes were good quality :) The air inflow was only through the hole of the briquette.

Funny was, that even when one briquette burned out, the next one ignited and the airflow continued through the hole of the first briquette.

Prototype Briquette gasifying stove

Richard Stanley and Kobus Venter October 2003

School cookstoves running on crop waste in North India
Ashden Cimate Care Award: NISHANT Bioenergy Consultancy, Chandigarh, Ramesh Kumar Nibhoria, July 2005

MALAWI: Mdula (Modular Mbaula) Mud Stove, Rok Oblak, Chembe, Malawi, October 2005

Mdula stove

Stove Mold

BIO19 Gold Medal Winner

BIO19 Biennial of Industrial Design Ljubljana, Slovenia

I want to inform you, that the WWF Finland and UIAH (University of arts and design Helsinki) project: Mdula - biomass briquette stove intervention in Malawi has won the Gold Medal Award on BIO19, represented by international jury of: Aldo Cibic (ITA), Robin Edman, ICSID (SWE), Czeslawa Frejlich (POL), Stephen Hitchins, BEDA (GB), Ruth Klotzel, ICOGRADA (BRA).

The project was set in Helsinki in January 2003 and realised in Malawi (Chembe Village) in January 2004 and finished in Ljubljana in September 2004. The concept is based on the local people material knowlege, upgraded with technological aspects and design skills of us, students, working together in the same environment to improve the situation in the LMNP (Lake Malawi National Park). It is a two-year multidisciplinary based international students effort, how to gain as much improvements possible with the least intervention done in the environment, social and cultural lifestyle of the local people.

The result is a concept of production of a no-cost biomass briquette stove Mdula (modular Mbaula), made with a simple wooden mold and clay as a construction material.

The final model is based on 8 study models, many field testings and interaction with the local people. It uses biomass briquettes combined with woodfuel to make the stove as effective as possible with the same manipulating procedure as burning and using three-stone cooking formation. The project has intention only to gain a long-term result.

Subscribe to Briquette Stove