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Figure 1: first step of processing palm oil - cooking in a big drum
Figure 2: second step of milling the palm fruits
Figure 3: the waste produced is completely dry, consisting of seed kernels and dried fiber
Lighting a 3 stone fire with Palm Wastes
The fire takes multiple tries to get it started
Lighting Cone to improve fire starting
Christa - Lighting cone in use on a charcoal stove

Huck Rorick & Pearly Wong
Groundwork Institute http://www.groundwork.org

In the community of Besongabang, Cameroon the families often use firewood to process palm oil. The oil is sold to other communitiies, and the Besongabang families use the dried wastes (the leftovers of palm oil processing) to help light fires that are used for cooking, and palm processing.

The first 3 pictures of are of the palm oil processing practies of Besongabang, and the third picture is of the wastes, which are mostly dried. These wastes are often used to start the 3 stone family cooking files, but as Pearly Wong notes, the process of starting these fires is labor intensive. The sticks light easily, but the palm wastes frequently go out, and sometimes the fire must be started multiple times before any cooking can happen.

In this community, they are comfortable using stick wood and logs and there are no charcoal stoves or charcoal production. Groundwork volunteers have been talking through several options with other members of the Biomass Cooking Stoves list, and also with the families in Besongabang. It seems like an improved wood stove would be a good fit for this community especially if the problem of lighting the fires could be resolved, and the families value the improvements that may come in the form of less labor, less smoke or less fuel used.

Crispin Pemberton-Pigot and Christa Roth suggested using a lighting cone to help start the stoves. The lighting cone provides extra shelter from the wind and extra draft, and may help the families in Besongabang start their fires with fewer attempts and less wood.

For more information about lighting cones see http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/content/using-metal-cone

Cookstoves Future Summit, November 20 - 21, 2014

http://www.cookstovesfuturesummit.org/

Some highlights include:
The Importance of Scale: Transforming the Way Half the World Cooks in our Lifetime
Moderator – Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation
Gina McCarthy, Administrator, US Environmental Protection Agency
Hanna Tetteh, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, Ghana

Clean Cookstoves and Fuels: A Necessary Ingredient in the Growing Ecosystem for Energy Access

Kandeh Yumkella, Chief Executive, Sustainable Energy for All
Keith E. Hansen, Vice President, Global Practices, World Bank Group
Alexander Aleinikoff, Deputy High Commissioner, UN High Commissioner for Refugees [invited]

Driving a Market for Clean and Efficient Cooking Solutions: The Supply Side

Moderator – Bajjiahtu Abubakar, National Coordinator of Renewable Energy Programme, Ministry of Environment, Nigeria
Jennifer Pryce, Chief Executive Officer, Calvert Foundation [invited]
‘Tokunboh Ishmael, President, Alitheia Capital
Allert van den Ham, Chief Executive Officer, SNV
Carlo Figà Talamanca, CEO, Sustainable Green Fuel Enterprise

For the full agenda, visit: http://www.cookstovesfuturesummit.org/agenda/.

toaster slot briquette stove liner with grate
toaster slot briquette stove liner with door flaps
toaster slot briquette stove liner with door flaps front
toaster slot briquette stove front one door flap open
toaster slot briquette stove doors open

TOASTER SLOT BRIQUETTE STOVE
I have been designing some briquette burning stoves for El Fuego del Sol, which is making square fuel briquettes from paper, cardboard, and sawdust in Port au Prince, Haiti:
https://sites.google.com/a/elfuegodelsol.com/elfuego/
The stoves are loosely based on rocket stove principles. My latest stove is inspired by the toaster. Briquettes are like thick pieces of bread. For good combustion they need to be surrounded by air and slightly separated from each other and the liner wall. This design holds 4 briquettes in two vertical slots of expanded stainless steel. As they burn down, new briquettes are added through insulated swinging door flaps.
Wrapping new briquettes in a sheet of paper before insertion ensures quick ignition and minimal smoke production.
Air comes in the front and bottom and can get to all sides of the briquettes. The insulated doors block much of the radiant heat from the upper briquettes from escaping out the front and keep briquettes from rolling out of the stove.
The liner will be surrounded with insulating bricks and have a galvanized steel outer shell. There will be a pot support frame and sheet metal pot skirt at the top.
The concept should also work well with round briquettes and dung fuel.

  2  FUELS FOR  I STOVE:    COCONUT SHELL CHARCOAL  OR  WOOD (IPIL-IPIL) (Leucaena  leuco
In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
Demonstration
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.

A Chef from São Paulo, who built a carry on rocket pizza oven, and sell gourmet pizzas on the streets of São Paulo.

And Rogério's Ecostove

For more about the EcoFagoa see http://www.ecofogao.com/

Now available internationally from www.cookswell.eu (Cookswell Nederlands) - original, handcrafted Kenyan designed energy saving charcoal convection ovens - bake, roast, toast or steam all of your favorite foods using just a tiny handful of charcoal.

Support local Kenyan innovators and a young Dutch businessman and you can save money, save energy and eat well with a Cookswell Oven.

To help encourage more people to start small business bakeries in East Africa we are proudly partnering with to offer comprehensive packages for starting up a small business. They include training on how to use a charcoal oven, baking tins, mixing bowls, business plans, internet registration and even an apron and a hat!

Classes are held just outside of Nairobi past Kikuyu or we can arrange to come to your location (in East Africa).

Learn how to bake healthy cookies, pizza, sweet potato bread, cakes, bread rolls and even roast peanuts to make peanut butter!

Contact cookswelljikos@gmail.com for more information.

TLUD Bread Oven
Flat Bread
TLUD Parts
TLUD Assembled
Oven Temp Profile

Estremera Nova, Bunyola, Illes Balears, Spain htttp://www.cuinessolars.jimdo.com

Marc Ayats Plana has been working on TLUD stoves and improved low thermal mass ovens. This TLUD powered low thermal mass oven was inspired by the Anderson's Recho Rocket Oven, and uses a Champion style TLUD heating stove to power the low thermal mass earth oven.

For Marc's excellent writ-up download the pdf TLUD-OVEN Description
These are some quick notes:

He has made some changes to the TLUD style oven

  • Increased primary air draft, which can apport enough oxigen to burn the charcoal generated during the gasification process and continue giving heat to the oven. Now the primary air enters around the lower perimeter of the reactor, instead of having a single inlet tube like in the original model.
  • Increased the length of the riser, which also sustains the diffuser. This extra extension allows the complete combustion of gases gasification to completely remove the visible smoke in the oven.
  • TLUD Reactor. Diameter: 20cm. Total length: 30cm. Fuel Height: 20cm
  • TLUD Outskirt. Diameter: 22cm. Diameter central hole: 10cm. Total length: 25cm
  • TLUD Riser and diffuser. Diameter: 12 cm. Total length: 30cm. Diffuser: granite piece 2cm thick and 15cm diameter
  • Fuel load: 3.38Kg pellets

The Low Thermal Mass oven is based on the Haiti Rocket oven http://www.rechoroket.com
To see more pictures of the TLUD oven and the process of construction go to:
http://cuinessolars.jimdo.com/forns/

In the Oven Temperature graph, you can see the complete temperature profile. Marc did a side by side comparison of both a 20cm reactor TLUD and a smaller TLUD, with 12,5cm reactor.
"Note: the temperatures refers to the inside side of the wall oven, half way between the baking surface and the top hole. Note2: the temperatures were taken by a temperature datalogger and a type K probe."

Marc's Notes and TLUD size comparison are copied here:
Notes about 20cm TLUD test

the Bingka Oven
Bingka Coconut Rice Cakes baked in the Bingka Oven
Torta baked in the Bingka Oven

Attached is my BINGKA OVEN fired by an Eco-Kalan-C using charcoal (oling) made from coconut shells. I have used charcoal as fuel as it burns clean. I have used firewood also but the soot that is formed inside the oven tarnishes the looks of whatever is baked in it. In the Philippines, there are many men and women who use the traditional “hornohan” for their home-based businesses of making bingka (sweet rice cake with coconut), tortas (breads filled or plain) and cakes made of cassava, ube, wheat and sweet rice. In most cases, one does not earn enough to pay for the medical costs of treating illnesses such as cancer, eye and skin infections and lung diseases which result from long term exposure to smoke and intense heat. By reducing fuel consumption and exposure to radiant heat and by removing the smoke from the cooking environment and immediate neighbourhood, the BINGKA OVEN can bring better health and higher living standards to poor families in the Philippines.

The use of biomass fibers used as binders of a charcoal matrix --all done at ambient temperatures and at pressures generated by a simple hand press (12 to 15 bars) -and there are many such options– is certainly a viable alternative to boiling up starch or sugar on one end or purchasing the mechanized press and consuming the energy to generate the higher temperature/pressure for lignin melting. I will being the samples to the stoves camp to show what kind of densities can be achieved by infilling a properly processed fiber matrix with such as charcoal fines but I find it puzzling that this alternative now active in 67 nations globally, escapes mention.

Richard Stanley

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