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ETHOS Lighting of the stoves
CREEC, Aprovecho Sam and others at ETHOS 2015
StoveTec TLUD with a toasting marshmallow
StoveTec Stove - new Colors
Christa Roth sitting near the StoveTec stoves
Peter Scott and others ETHOS 2015
Kirk Harris TLUD
Rocket Works Stove ETHOS 2015

ETHOS Cooking Stoves Conference in Kirkland, Washington January, 2015.
for more about the next ETHOS Conference see http://www.ethoscon.com/

The ETHOS conference brings together people involved in stove design, dissemination, and testing from Universities, Government, and Non Government organizations, and has themes around the topics of improving cook stove design and performance, reducing emissions, and improving stove adoption, but listening to the needs of the people using the stoves. It ends with the 'lighting of the stoves' which is a demonstration of some of the cooking stoves that people have talked about in the conference.

In addition to capturing photos of the stoves, this year I captured a few pictures of the crowd of attendees comparing stove designs, toasting marshmallows, etc.

The big green stove is the InStove institutional rocket stove http://instove.org/

The lovely people taking pictures were from CREEC ( Energy and Energy Conservation ) which presented a great analysis of current cooking stove tests and some insights to improve them. They also noted that fans typically fail in Uganda, and there are no fans available to replace them.
For more about CREEC see http://creec.or.ug

StoveTec and Aprovecho presented some interesting innovations in stove design that they hope to field test in the coming year. The light green stove has an insulated top door for adding fuel to their TLUD style stove. The purple stove is their rocket stove that has been optimized for improved particulate emissions, with an improved set of colors.
For more about StoveTec stoves see http://stovetecstore.net/
for more about Aprovecho and stove testing see http://www.aprovecho.org/lab/index.php

I was happy to get a good picture of Christa Roth of GiZ her handbook of MicroGasification is outstanding, to download a copy go to https://energypedia.info/wiki/File:Micro_Gasification_2.0_Cooking_with_g...

File attachments: 
TLUD Oven
height adjustment for turn-down
Oven Temperatures
Wood Pyrolysis to Char burning transition
bread baked in the TLUD oven

Marc Ayats Plana has updated his TLUD Oven paper the latest results. You can download a copy here.
http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/files/tlud_oven_english-update.pdf

This Oven started out as an experiment in creating a low mass oven using a rocket style stove, and after some experimentation Marc switched to a TLUD style stove to improve the oven's efficiency and to also be able to use agricultural residues, almond shells, instead of wood. Please see the report for details.

And there is more on the Fogons Solares web site:
http://www.cuinessolars.jimdo.com

File attachments: 

The Wonderwerk TLUD natural draft test stoves use a combustor section above the secondary burn area to provide time and space for the secondary flame to burn more completely.

The project started as a way to shorten the overall height of a TLUD stove by adding an improved combustor. In the process of Kirk Harris improved the efficiency of the stove.
His write-up: http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/files/wws_tlud_combustor_paper102714.pdf

Kirk modified the original TLUD design ( http://www.drtlud.com ) to include a concentratior and used Venturi principles to blend secondary air to improved combustion.

File attachments: 

BURN Manufacturing
http://www.burnmanufacturing.com

Jikopoa stove and partnership with Equity Bank to bring improved stoves to families in Kenya.

Burn factory tour:

Figure 1: first step of processing palm oil - cooking in a big drum
Figure 2: second step of milling the palm fruits
Figure 3: the waste produced is completely dry, consisting of seed kernels and dried fiber
Lighting a 3 stone fire with Palm Wastes
The fire takes multiple tries to get it started
Lighting Cone to improve fire starting
Christa - Lighting cone in use on a charcoal stove

Huck Rorick & Pearly Wong
Groundwork Institute http://www.groundwork.org

In the community of Besongabang, Cameroon the families often use firewood to process palm oil. The oil is sold to other communitiies, and the Besongabang families use the dried wastes (the leftovers of palm oil processing) to help light fires that are used for cooking, and palm processing.

The first 3 pictures of are of the palm oil processing practies of Besongabang, and the third picture is of the wastes, which are mostly dried. These wastes are often used to start the 3 stone family cooking files, but as Pearly Wong notes, the process of starting these fires is labor intensive. The sticks light easily, but the palm wastes frequently go out, and sometimes the fire must be started multiple times before any cooking can happen.

In this community, they are comfortable using stick wood and logs and there are no charcoal stoves or charcoal production. Groundwork volunteers have been talking through several options with other members of the Biomass Cooking Stoves list, and also with the families in Besongabang. It seems like an improved wood stove would be a good fit for this community especially if the problem of lighting the fires could be resolved, and the families value the improvements that may come in the form of less labor, less smoke or less fuel used.

Crispin Pemberton-Pigot and Christa Roth suggested using a lighting cone to help start the stoves. The lighting cone provides extra shelter from the wind and extra draft, and may help the families in Besongabang start their fires with fewer attempts and less wood.

For more information about lighting cones see http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/content/using-metal-cone

Cookstoves Future Summit, November 20 - 21, 2014

http://www.cookstovesfuturesummit.org/

Some highlights include:
The Importance of Scale: Transforming the Way Half the World Cooks in our Lifetime
Moderator – Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation
Gina McCarthy, Administrator, US Environmental Protection Agency
Hanna Tetteh, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, Ghana

Clean Cookstoves and Fuels: A Necessary Ingredient in the Growing Ecosystem for Energy Access

Kandeh Yumkella, Chief Executive, Sustainable Energy for All
Keith E. Hansen, Vice President, Global Practices, World Bank Group
Alexander Aleinikoff, Deputy High Commissioner, UN High Commissioner for Refugees [invited]

Driving a Market for Clean and Efficient Cooking Solutions: The Supply Side

Moderator – Bajjiahtu Abubakar, National Coordinator of Renewable Energy Programme, Ministry of Environment, Nigeria
Jennifer Pryce, Chief Executive Officer, Calvert Foundation [invited]
‘Tokunboh Ishmael, President, Alitheia Capital
Allert van den Ham, Chief Executive Officer, SNV
Carlo Figà Talamanca, CEO, Sustainable Green Fuel Enterprise

For the full agenda, visit: http://www.cookstovesfuturesummit.org/agenda/.

toaster slot briquette stove liner with grate
toaster slot briquette stove liner with door flaps
toaster slot briquette stove liner with door flaps front
toaster slot briquette stove front one door flap open
toaster slot briquette stove doors open

TOASTER SLOT BRIQUETTE STOVE
I have been designing some briquette burning stoves for El Fuego del Sol, which is making square fuel briquettes from paper, cardboard, and sawdust in Port au Prince, Haiti:
https://sites.google.com/a/elfuegodelsol.com/elfuego/
The stoves are loosely based on rocket stove principles. My latest stove is inspired by the toaster. Briquettes are like thick pieces of bread. For good combustion they need to be surrounded by air and slightly separated from each other and the liner wall. This design holds 4 briquettes in two vertical slots of expanded stainless steel. As they burn down, new briquettes are added through insulated swinging door flaps.
Wrapping new briquettes in a sheet of paper before insertion ensures quick ignition and minimal smoke production.
Air comes in the front and bottom and can get to all sides of the briquettes. The insulated doors block much of the radiant heat from the upper briquettes from escaping out the front and keep briquettes from rolling out of the stove.
The liner will be surrounded with insulating bricks and have a galvanized steel outer shell. There will be a pot support frame and sheet metal pot skirt at the top.
The concept should also work well with round briquettes and dung fuel.

  2  FUELS FOR  I STOVE:    COCONUT SHELL CHARCOAL  OR  WOOD (IPIL-IPIL) (Leucaena  leuco
In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
Demonstration
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.

A Chef from São Paulo, who built a carry on rocket pizza oven, and sell gourmet pizzas on the streets of São Paulo.

And Rogério's Ecostove

For more about the EcoFagoa see http://www.ecofogao.com/

Now available internationally from www.cookswell.eu (Cookswell Nederlands) - original, handcrafted Kenyan designed energy saving charcoal convection ovens - bake, roast, toast or steam all of your favorite foods using just a tiny handful of charcoal.

Support local Kenyan innovators and a young Dutch businessman and you can save money, save energy and eat well with a Cookswell Oven.

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