Metal

IFB stainless liner school rocket stove
IFB stainless liner school rocket stove skirt detail

On a recent trip to Haiti, I completed the first prototype of a new school rocket stove. This one has a 26 ga 330 stainless steel firebox liner, 2½" insulating firebrick walls, and galvanized steel outer shell. The skirt is 304 stainless inside, 1" ceramic fiber in the skirt floor and walls, and galvanized steel outer. The mouth and firebox are 6½" x 6½". The pot is 40 qts with the top diameter about 1/4" larger than the diameter near the bottom, and is imported. The locally available spherical bottom pots made skirt construction extremely difficult. We hope to someday produce this stove in quantity at a combined vocational school/stove factory.

steam pan charcoal stove
steam pan charcoal stove side bottom view
steam pan charcoal stove bottom with perforated lollipop air control
perforated lollipop air control closed

In my continuing quest to use readily available manufactured materials for stove construction, here is the steam pan charcoal stove with "perforated lollipop" air control. It is a 1/6 size steam pan (roughly 6" x 7" x 4" deep) inside a 1/2 size (roughly 10" x 12" x 6" deep) with 1" ceramic fiber board insulation between. The charcoal chamber is lined with expanded stainless steel to extend the life of the inner pan and improve air flow. Army surplus D rings are used for pot supports. Threaded rod for legs. It can be easily disassembled for repair. It has a small charcoal capacity like the BURN's Jikokoa (formerly Tank).
I plan to eventually build a two burner version in a full size steam pan.b

Manufacturing is helping improve the lives of women and girls in East Africa with its efficient charcoal-burning Jikokoa™ stove and opportunities for women to participate in its workforce. The stove itself represents a step-change in the design and efficiency of charcoal-burning cookstoves. As well as being an aspirational household product, it cuts down on smoke and soot by more than 60% compared to the widely used Kenya ceramic jiko. But it’s not just women using the stoves who benefit. With all manufacture now done in a new state-of-the-art factory in Kenya, BURN emphasises that all jobs are open to both men and women at all levels – just over half of its workforce are women.

More about the 2015 International Ashden Award Winners
http://www.ashden.org/awards/2015/international

sink charcoal stove
rebar inverted pyramid charcoal stove

The inverted pyramid rebar stove is ubiquitous in Haiti. Lots of radiation and convection away from the pot. No air control. Pot is often placed directly on the charcoal which quenches the charcoal and interferes with good radiative heat transfer.
I cut up a scrap stainless steel kitchen sink, built a sheet metal outer box, put in 1" of ceramic fiber board insulation, and added legs and pot supports. The inverted pyramid grate will have the legs shortened and be placed inside the "sink". A slide gate with sets of progressively smaller holes will be added to the "drain" for air control.

Small gas cooker using pellet biocarbon
Medium gas cooker burning pellet biocarbon
Medium gas cooker with pot and  'Vietnam Magic Fire'
Close up of Medium gas cooker"Vietnam Magic Fire'
pellet biocarbon
Shaped "anthill" biocarbon Briquette

After over 30 years of doing theoretical and experimental research, the authors of this document (Newtech Co., Ltd. in Quy Nhon city, Binh Dinh and Tan My Kim Co., Ltd. in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam), until now, have completed all not only modern but also cheap & user-friendly technology solutions which can help the poor all over the world do cooking by gas generated at their home without buying any drops of liquefied gas.

These technologies solutions can be developed in a country or in a big city or small town in any countries in the world, even it is in America, Europe, Australia and especially in Asia and Africa.

The authors believe that the modern but simple technology solutions stated hereby will start an era of a great revolution in cooking for billions of the poor all over the world and they hope that such technology will satisfy all poor persons.

The authors are very willingly to transfer these technologies to the countries in accordance with the international law in order to be together with such countries to help the poor all over the world.

Potential Energy http://www.potentialenergy.org/ stoves are the stoves original designed in the Berkley labs for Sudan (the Darfur region). They are an energy efficient stove designed with the cook's needs in mind.

They have recently added an orange 'cool mesh' to the outside of their metal stove to help protect the stove user (and their children) from burns. The second photo is of a stove field test, where ladies in Africa can see for themselves the advantages and disadvantages of several designs.

The Berkley stove is created out of metal and then shipped to local artisans who assemble the stove in the field. This video shows part of the process.

The stove was developed by Adrian Padt and Aidan Oosthuysen, and Richard Pocock, and uses a familiar Rocket design surrounded by a wire cage to improve the stove's stability and reduce burns. It's a smart looking stove, it saves women time and energy in gathering firewood, and it has lower emissions than the solutions it is typically replacing.

Lighting instructions:

The Rocket Works Stove, web site http://www.rocketworks.org/

  • The Rockt Works stove is a high efficiency wood burning stove, designed to accommodate multiple fuels when required.
  • It is smokeless after initial combustion, thereby reducing the likelihood of carbon monoxide poisoning and reducing the emission of black carbon particles.
  • The outer cage remains cool to touch even after hours of cooking, due to our innovative design.
  • It is made from high quality, heat resistant stainless steel allowing for years of regular use.
  • It can boil 5 liters of water in 15 minutes using as little as 250g of wood, which is significantly less than traditional cooking methods.
  • Its thermal efficiency is 45%, for the Large Pot High Power, performed by the SeTAR Thermal Efficiency Test.
  • Its emissions are the best in its class.

Basic Specification:

  • Mass: 2.95Kgs
  • Height: 270mm
  • Diameter : 240mm

Lighting instructions in English:

Great half hour television program explaining Rice Hull Gasifier Stoves, and their potential in Vietnam.

It includes a good comparison of different stove types and designs, and interviews with people using the stoves.

Same video, the Vietnamese version:

 Quad – 2012 to Present
Quad Flat Assembly

The Quad TLUD has features for easier production (using tabs and slots, and zero rivets), easier shipping (as flat-pack pieces), local assembly, and greater stability and coolness of four wooden handles that serve also as legs. Without question, there will be further improvements as the number of users increases and they provide feedback. For example, households using the Quad TLUD stoves in various refugee camps could make suggestions that outsiders might fail to foresee. Jigs, tools and methods for making flat-pack pieces are being prepared in the USA for availability to stove projects worldwide.

Material: Sheet metal and 4 wooden handles/legs

Cost: Mwoto and Quad TLUDs sell for approximately US$15 in Uganda, and should eventually cost less, especially if purchased in bulk as flat-pack pieces to be assembled by a local project.

Dimensions: Currently one size, but size can be easily changed: Height: 19” (48 cm), Square footprint 12 x 12” (300 x 300 mm); Fuel cylinder height 14 “ (36 cm) with diameters from 5 to 7” (12 to 18 cm).
Test results of Quad and closely related TLUD stoves such as Mwoto and Champion:

CO & PM Emissions: Consistently the lowest for any of the natural draft stoves that burn solid biomass.

Thermal efficiency: Range from 35% to 41% currently. Expected to go even higher.

Fuel consumption: 1050 to 1600 grams for a standard WBT of cold start plus simmer (respectably low).

Fuel types: TLUDs can utilize a wide variety of low-value chunky dry biomass fuels (e.g. corncobs, tree seed pods, nut shells), including briquette pieces that can be locally produced from unused biomass. “Stick-wood” is not a common TLUD fuel, but can be used vertically as “wood segments.” Vertical segments also with papyrus reeds, bamboo, etc.
Options: The Quad can be made as a TChar variation for ease of using the created charcoal as fuel in a charcoal stove or as biochar that is added to the soil.

For further information, contact Dr. Paul Anderson at: Email: psanders@ilstu.edu
and visit www.drtlud.com for future updates about TLUD gasifier technology.

http://www.trust.org/item/20130723104434-3k5zt/

Clean stove cooks up power alongside food
Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Tue, 23 Jul 2013 10:44 AM

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