Metal

Daniel Wald July, 2011

Envirofit's G-3300 Wood Stove

G-3300 Stove with Flexible Pot SkirtG-3300 Stove with Flexible Pot Skirt

This is a pretty straight-forward, efficient wood cooking stove, with a rest in the front for loading stick wood. It's pretty nice looking, and they've worked with Oak Ridge Natl. Labs to create a durable combustion area.

It's got a couple of neat accessories. The one on the picture above is a flexible pot skirt. Pot skirts do a wonderful job of increasing heating efficiency, but they can be hard to implement because not all cooking pots are the same size. This solves that problem simply, and it looks nice which as we know from user feedback is critical to stove success.

They have a chimney attachment which adds another "burner" to the stove, and helps vent smoke more efficiently.

Spec sheets and manuals are on their web site:
http://www.envirofit.org/cookstoves/g-3300.html

Envirofit's CH-4400 Charcoal Stove

Envirofit Charcoal StoveEnvirofit Charcoal Stove with Cooking Pot

Apparently this is all the charcoal cooking stove. It is designed to be one of the cleanest burning stoves available. At first, I mistook the tall top part to be a cooking pot, but instead it is part of the stove. According to the instructions, the user needs a combination of charcoal and wood sticks or chips, that are loaded into the bottom of the stove, then the upper part with the pot skirt allows the stove to burn more efficiently. There are attachments for the other version of this charcoal stove that allow for grilling. This one seems more optimized for pots.

Additional information on the Charcoal stove:
http://www.envirofit.org/cookstoves/ch-4400.html

Biochar Industries part of Biochar Project in Kunghur Australia is now selling Biochar TLUD cook stoves as part of our plan to make more people aware of the benefits of biochar.

TLUD is an acronym for Top Lit Up Draught meaning you lite it at the top and the air is sucked up through the fire. Fantastic device that is light to carry and will work with all woods great survival tool . The best feature of this Tlud is when the flames go out you then have biochar. All you have to do is drop the embers on the ground and spray some water on them so they don’t continue to burn.

This particular model was imported from India and has a very nice finish and somehow I ended up with some to sell so I wanted to let my readers know first before I start selling them at stores and markets.

More on TLUD stoves http://www.drtlud.com/

Jock Gill, May, 2011

Jock has updated his iCan instructions on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jockgill/sets/72157626640937954/

from Jock's email:

The triplets of triplets in the secondary air supply is a significant improvement.

The 18-12-6 iCan now has much greater total time with a very well behaved flame and an air fuel mixture that is lean to good for most of the run.
There are still several minutes of a too rich mixture that does emit some soot.

Run time on 350 grams was 27:45, most of the smoke was gone within 2 minutes, just two floaters, and the biochar had a good clean nose. This is about as good as I have gotten so far.

From
From
From
From

Avani charcoal stove http://avanicharcoalstove.blogspot.com/ is designed using the most common empty oil tin cans (15 liters) available in parts of India. Steel mesh, rods and a forged iron grate are also used. This stove can be made with less skills. The steel wire mesh used inside, protects the tin as well draws in air. Other liners like clay, and any other material can also be tried. Recently trained women and youth in its production at Avani - an organization at Berinag, Pittoragarh District, Uttarakhand (Himalayas), India. Here the pine needle charcoal briquettes are used. This stove has some common features of My Home Stove 2. http://myhomestove2.blogspot.com/ This is light weight, requires less skills to make it, convenient for adoption.

Ray Menke

My wife and I made a short video showing how we make Pita Bread using a version of this stove design. Here is the link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOuoE2KAbQI

Jock Gill, April 2011
Peacham, Vermont, usa


My little iCan made from a 3 lbs Costco coffee can boiled 1.75 liters of water in 42 minutes this afternoon. Ambient temp was 47 [8.33C]. This was done in 5 batches averaging 350 ml each. A very clean burn. Some soot at the start of each batch when the water was cold. Just a soon as the water in the cup warmed up a bit, the soot stopped.

Of course I also made some biochar as well.

Fuel was a good quality wood pellet. Cost of fuel: about 17 cents assuming pellets at $230 per ton. They can be bought for a good deal less, but I am using a higher number to be safe.

Cost per liter boiled: ~ 7.4 cents, allowing 4 cents as the value of the biochar captured at the rate of 17.5% of the dry weight of the fuel.

Gustavo Pena, Stove Team International
and Larry Winiarski

This is a Hybrid Combustion Rocket, TLUD stove designed for practical use with the help of Larry Winiarski, and with Gustavo Peña of Stove Team International.

See also:

Alexis Belonio, Bima Tahar, and Bonny Minang

A super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove was recently developed in Indonesia to provide households with an affordable clean-burning cooking device using rice husks as fuel.

Within the 3 years of development on rice husk gasifier stove, PT Minang Jordanindo Approtech has finally come up with the super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove carrying a selling price of US$10 to 15, which is very much cheaper as compared with the previous model with a selling price of US$20. With this development, consumers don’t need to amortize for the stove, as what is currently practiced in villages in Indonesia, for them to acquire a unit of the stove in order for them to save money on fuel. Moreover, this stove is now made available to end users at a low cost, freeing the distributors from the task of devising financing schemes just to make the technology affordable to the local households.

As shown, the stove consists of only few parts. It was designed and made so simple to maximize the use of materials and to simplify the production using locally available resources. This stove model has the following basic parts: (a) the casing is made of tin can and can be bought at a very low price from a Can Factory; (b) the reactor can be subcontracted from a sheet metal manufacturer as well as the stove cover
and the burner; (c) the fan, which uses DC 12 volt, 2 watt supplies the required air to gasify rice husks. The flame coming out of the burner is bluish in color, which indicates a very clean gas. It has low black carbon emission of about 50 ug/m3 and below. The CO2 emission is about 0.6 kg CO2 per kg rice husks.

Anil K. Rajvanshi
NARI February, 2011

Kerosene lanstove is a device which simultaneously produces very high quality of light, cooks a complete meal for a family of 4-5 people and boils 10 liters of water. The word lanstove has been coined by our Institute NARI (http://www.nariphaltan.org ). The kerosene combustion is excellent with CO levels less than 3-4 ppm and particulates are within WHO limits. Lanstove is as convenient as LPG stove cooking and has been tested in rural households in India. http://www.nariphaltan.org/kerolanstove.pdf

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