Metal

I recently discovered these aluminum cookpots with stubby rods welded to the bottom to act as fins. These should improve heat transfer to the cookpot.

http://stores.cajunrocketpot.com/-strse-Cajun-Rocket-Stock-Pots/Categori...

Cajun Rocket Stock Pots
4 mm Aluminum Professional Cookware. All our stock pots come with lids. Great for reducing, cooking, frying & boiling stocks, soups, gumbos, potatoes, seafood, pasta, ... Reduces cooktime and fuel usage, saving you time & money. Abosrbs more energy from your burner & distributes that energy more evenly throughout the cooking process. Length dimensions include handles

Greetings

We just started the Stove manufacturing, we have the infrastructure for desired qty u asked, I have attached the image of the stove, you can contact us if you require any more information.

Thanks & Regards,
Prashanth CV
CEO
PTC-INDIA
# 2332, K R Road, 20th Cross,
Bana Shankari II Stage,
Bangalore – 560070,

TEL : 91-80-65411295, MOBILE: +91-98440 46383
FAX : 91-80-26577146, SKYPE: prashu.cv
E-mail : ptc.blr@gmail.com,
web : www.udaygroup.com

A few more pictures to clarify how the Rim Fire iCan is built. It is quite simple.

Materials:

Hi all many of you don´t know me, I start 5 years ago with the help of Nancy Hughes from Stove Team International and with a little help form Carlos Santana, since then I have learn some stove principles desings with Larry Winiarski, 2 years ago the Global Alliance invite me to attend the wood cooking stove forum in Lima Peru, in the opportunities brought along a hybrid stove Rocket/TLUD similar to the DK stove. and I´m working with a metal rocket combustion chamber wich will be done next week, we´ll make some KPT for 2 months before I send pictures, but tomorrow I´ll post some pictures of my hybrid metal rocket-TLUD that I made 2 1/2 years ago.

this what I was talking about, I made this combustión chamber 2 years ago and is working good, I´m desingnig a stove at this momento with one of this combustión chambers. if someeno need plans and pictures just let me know, hofully some can make some imprivements

Gustavo

Removing Handles
Cutting the Throat Hole
Cutting a Top Hole
Internal Elbow
Sheet Metal Held in place with Vermiculite

Nothing fancy but more on the same theme

M Trevor.

Jiko Bomba, load the lower half with pellets
Jiko Bomba Gasifying the Pellets and making char
Jiko Bomba, blue flame showing gasification
Jiko Bomba, lower chamber, where charred pellets can be used for low temperature Cooking

Here is some pictures of the Jiko Bomba casification cookstove.
The first shows the two part of the stove with pellet as fuel in the firebox before fire is lit.
Second show the stove burning.
The third the same, in the end of the gasification.
The forth shows the charcoal stage where the pellets remains as glowing carbon. A pot can be put on top of the bottom part of the stove, there are three supports for that.

Yours
Bjarne Laustsen

Here is an example (hard to see of course because it is a still taken from a video) of the spinning of the flame caused by the shaped grate at the bottom.
The fire is circular because it is spinning rapidly, though pushed to the side by the way the fuel happened to be sitting. The spin adds turbulence without a fan and assists in keeping the flame away from the combustion chamber wall.
Here is a really cool picture of a Vesto burning walnut shells in TLUD mode.
Finally, here is a photo of a Vesto cutaway showing the inside parts in their correct positons.

Dear Marc and Ron and All interested in air flows

This is a response to questions about air and Marc’s tube.

Here is an old photo of secondary air entering the combustion chamber of a Vesto pushing the flame to the centre. This accomplishes the following:

Keeps the fire away from the wall, reducing the temperature it has to survive (a lot)
Keeps the flame going
Not allowing it to spread to one side away from the smoke on the other side that might otherwise ‘get away’.
Provides turbulent mixing of flame, hot secondary air and smoke
Allows for preheating to a significant degree (250-500 C)

The fire is circular because it is spinning rapidly, though pushed to the side by the way the fuel happened to be sitting. The spin adds turbulence without a fan and assists in keeping the flame away from the combustion chamber wall.

Here is a Vesto burning switchgrass pellets operating as TLUD, showing that there is nothing special about a TLUD in the sense of it having to operate in a particular fashion. The air flow through the fuel is reduced by the fuel and it operates as a TLUD. The secondary air is send across the surface to keep a deck of flame going at the height of the holes. This obviates the need for adding a circular disk at the top to ’keep the flame going’. Adding a ‘concentrator’ as Paul calls it takes more material and moves the fire too far away from the heat of the pyrolysis bed leading to unwanted flame-outs from time to time. A major issue with all pyrolysing TLUD’s. It is simply not necessary. Just keep the fire near the fuel. This also provides additional vertical space for the flame to finish burning before getting to a cold pot surface.

Finally, here is a photo of a Vesto cutaway showing the inside parts in their correct positons.

The primary air controller is the ring with holes in it. When the handle is moved to the side the holes are closed.

A loaded kinyanjui type barrel kiln carbonizing maize cobs
free fuel!
a full kin of maize cob and branch charcoal made in less the a day
the maize cob charcoal cooks with high heat and little smoke.

Four very good reasons why to make your own charcoal from dry maize cobs.

  1. They are FREE!! (minimal processing required and are widely available as a farm waste product)
  2. Maize cob charcoal is very easy to make and leaves few charcoal fines. (no need for expensive briquetting)
  3. They are easy to light and burn very hot with little ash and are perfect for cooking a quick meal.
  4. Using maize cob charcoal means ZERO reliance on tree's and forests, LPG gas or unreliable and expensive electricity supplies for your cooking fuel needs. And with a Cookswell Jiko you can bake, boil, roast and toast all of your favorite foods
File attachments: 
Quad 2 Stove

Paul Anderson, Centre for Research in Energy and Energy Conservation (CREEC)

The Centre for Research in Energy and Energy Conservation (CREEC) is a not-for-profit organization which works “to enhance access to modern types of energy through research, training and consultancy”.

The CREEC offers independent stove testing services, and has recently tested the Quad 2 Stove.

For the full test report and method see the pdf:
http://www.stoves.bioenergylists.org/files/quad_2_stove.pdf

The center tested the Quad 2 Stove and found that:
The Quad stove boils 5L of water in 27 minutes. To boil and simmer 5L of water, it uses 636g of dry wood and has an energy use of 11713kJ. It has a thermal efficiency of 42% during the high power phase and 41% during simmering. It has a turndown ratio of 1.4, an indication that the stove’s firepower can be controlled for different cooking regimes. Its fuel use is considered to achieve significant, measurabe health and environmental goals according to the Lima Consensus Tiers of stove ranking.

With regards to safety, the stove scored 77.5% and is rated GOOD and is considered a Substantial Improvement according to the Lima Consensus Tiers of stove ranking.

File attachments: 

Christa Roth's excellent report
Micro-gasification: Cooking with gas from dry biomass

has a new location:
https://energypedia.info/wiki/File:Micro_Gasification_Cooking_with_gas_f...

Her comprehensive survey of micro-gasification technology has great technical information and is well worth the read.

thanks to GiZ (the German people) for making it available to all of us.

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