TLUD

TLUD Bread Oven
Flat Bread
TLUD Parts
TLUD Assembled
Oven Temp Profile

Estremera Nova, Bunyola, Illes Balears, Spain htttp://www.cuinessolars.jimdo.com

Marc Ayats Plana has been working on TLUD stoves and improved low thermal mass ovens. This TLUD powered low thermal mass oven was inspired by the Anderson's Recho Rocket Oven, and uses a Champion style TLUD heating stove to power the low thermal mass earth oven.

For Marc's excellent writ-up download the pdf TLUD-OVEN Description
These are some quick notes:

He has made some changes to the TLUD style oven

  • Increased primary air draft, which can apport enough oxigen to burn the charcoal generated during the gasification process and continue giving heat to the oven. Now the primary air enters around the lower perimeter of the reactor, instead of having a single inlet tube like in the original model.
  • Increased the length of the riser, which also sustains the diffuser. This extra extension allows the complete combustion of gases gasification to completely remove the visible smoke in the oven.
  • TLUD Reactor. Diameter: 20cm. Total length: 30cm. Fuel Height: 20cm
  • TLUD Outskirt. Diameter: 22cm. Diameter central hole: 10cm. Total length: 25cm
  • TLUD Riser and diffuser. Diameter: 12 cm. Total length: 30cm. Diffuser: granite piece 2cm thick and 15cm diameter
  • Fuel load: 3.38Kg pellets

The Low Thermal Mass oven is based on the Haiti Rocket oven http://www.rechoroket.com
To see more pictures of the TLUD oven and the process of construction go to:
http://cuinessolars.jimdo.com/forns/

In the Oven Temperature graph, you can see the complete temperature profile. Marc did a side by side comparison of both a 20cm reactor TLUD and a smaller TLUD, with 12,5cm reactor.
"Note: the temperatures refers to the inside side of the wall oven, half way between the baking surface and the top hole. Note2: the temperatures were taken by a temperature datalogger and a type K probe."

Marc's Notes and TLUD size comparison are copied here:
Notes about 20cm TLUD test

Notes from Paul Anderson
Gustavo has presented a very nice video of the use of a tall TLUD gasifier under a DUAL purpose stove frame (frame = stove structure without the heat source) that first boiled 5 liters of water in 12 minutes, and then converted into a plancha stove with chimney, cooking papusas (related to tortillas). Total cooking time 1 hour 45 minutes on one batch of wood chips/chunks (5237 grams) that yielded 1300 g of char. 25% weight yield of char. Probably could have operated an additional 10 minutes with pyrolysis fire and a slightly lower percentage yield of char.

Note: That is approximately 4000 g of fuel of pyrolytic gases (including moisture content that was probably near 15%). Any ash content (probably 1% of the raw fuel) remained in the char.

For a comprehensive resource for TLUD stoves, see Paul's web site: http://www.drtlud.com/

 Quad – 2012 to Present
Quad Flat Assembly

The Quad TLUD has features for easier production (using tabs and slots, and zero rivets), easier shipping (as flat-pack pieces), local assembly, and greater stability and coolness of four wooden handles that serve also as legs. Without question, there will be further improvements as the number of users increases and they provide feedback. For example, households using the Quad TLUD stoves in various refugee camps could make suggestions that outsiders might fail to foresee. Jigs, tools and methods for making flat-pack pieces are being prepared in the USA for availability to stove projects worldwide.

Material: Sheet metal and 4 wooden handles/legs

Cost: Mwoto and Quad TLUDs sell for approximately US$15 in Uganda, and should eventually cost less, especially if purchased in bulk as flat-pack pieces to be assembled by a local project.

Dimensions: Currently one size, but size can be easily changed: Height: 19” (48 cm), Square footprint 12 x 12” (300 x 300 mm); Fuel cylinder height 14 “ (36 cm) with diameters from 5 to 7” (12 to 18 cm).
Test results of Quad and closely related TLUD stoves such as Mwoto and Champion:

CO & PM Emissions: Consistently the lowest for any of the natural draft stoves that burn solid biomass.

Thermal efficiency: Range from 35% to 41% currently. Expected to go even higher.

Fuel consumption: 1050 to 1600 grams for a standard WBT of cold start plus simmer (respectably low).

Fuel types: TLUDs can utilize a wide variety of low-value chunky dry biomass fuels (e.g. corncobs, tree seed pods, nut shells), including briquette pieces that can be locally produced from unused biomass. “Stick-wood” is not a common TLUD fuel, but can be used vertically as “wood segments.” Vertical segments also with papyrus reeds, bamboo, etc.
Options: The Quad can be made as a TChar variation for ease of using the created charcoal as fuel in a charcoal stove or as biochar that is added to the soil.

For further information, contact Dr. Paul Anderson at: Email: psanders@ilstu.edu
and visit www.drtlud.com for future updates about TLUD gasifier technology.

Hi all many of you don´t know me, I start 5 years ago with the help of Nancy Hughes from Stove Team International and with a little help form Carlos Santana, since then I have learn some stove principles desings with Larry Winiarski, 2 years ago the Global Alliance invite me to attend the wood cooking stove forum in Lima Peru, in the opportunities brought along a hybrid stove Rocket/TLUD similar to the DK stove. and I´m working with a metal rocket combustion chamber wich will be done next week, we´ll make some KPT for 2 months before I send pictures, but tomorrow I´ll post some pictures of my hybrid metal rocket-TLUD that I made 2 1/2 years ago.

this what I was talking about, I made this combustión chamber 2 years ago and is working good, I´m desingnig a stove at this momento with one of this combustión chambers. if someeno need plans and pictures just let me know, hofully some can make some imprivements

Gustavo

Muhammad Nurhuda from the Physics Department, Brawijaya University
in Malang, Indonesia

They have developed a various biomass stoves ( Kompor Biomass ) The fuels also vary from chopped woods/twigs, pellet, palm kernel shell, hazelnut kernel shell, corncob, etc..

And they have a nice collection of YouTube videos:

All stoves presented above are of TLUD types, but the combustion is improved by using pre-heating and counter-flow burning mechanism. The one intended for palm kernel shell utilizes diffused-combustion mechanism, in addition to pre-heating and counter flow mechanism.

The latest one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b70z9-0nK6E

is devoted for institutional cook stove or small restaurants.

Very recently, we have also developed a new rocket stove. The combustion in this new rocket stove is improved by introducing counter-flow burning mechanism.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kID0YL6TyqA

New video and print resources available at www.aqsolutions.org.

Contamination of drinking water sources by synthetic organic compounds (SOCs – e.g. pesticides, pharmaceuticals, fuel compounds, etc.) is a growing worldwide problem. Many of these chemicals bio-accumulate in the human body and cause cancer, birth defects and diseases of the reproductive system, and disrupt endocrine and neurological systems. However, few low-cost, sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies are available to rural and developing communities for SOC removal.

Water filtration using charcoal is an ancient practice that continues today in non-industrialized regions around the world, though it has not yet been rigorously demonstrated for removal of modern industrial pollutants. Unfortunately, charcoal production by traditional kiln systems is often a resource-intensive and highly polluting process, and kiln processes are typically not optimized for production of good water filter char. Low cost, energy efficient, environmentally sustainable and scalable local production of optimal water filter char can be accomplished with biomass gasification (e.g. cookstoves and larger units using the TLUD design).

The video and print resources available on the Aqueous Solutions website (www.aqsolutions.org) are intended to

  1. summarize current results of collaborative field and laboratory research pertaining to the use of traditional kiln charcoals and gasifier chars in decentralized water treatment that targets SOCs,
  2. provide instructional materials for construction and operation of small- and intermediate- scale gasifier char production units using local materials, and
  3. provide instructional materials for integration of biochar filtration into a multi-barrier small- and intermediate- scale water treatment systems constructed from inexpensive and widely available materials.

Biocharproject.org announces the stumpy biochar combination cooker.

Its a tlud its a rocket stove it has many applications and fully customisable.
Simple design utilises waste LPG tanks to provide safe efficent cheap cooking.

Designed and Made in Australia by Biochar Project and Labrador Mens shed.

See the complete story on http://biocharproject.org

Open source free design

TChar Technology for Cookstoves: Part B: Construction has been released. It is available for download at:
http://drtlud.com/
The TChar is a TLUD which lifts off at the end of the gasifier phase to drop char into either a charcoal stove bottom for continued use as cooking charcoal or a quench base for later use as charcoal or biochar.

The TChar(tm) stove is a TLUD stove that lifts off at the end of the gasification stage to drop the charcoal into a T-base(tm): a charcoal stove to continue cooking with the charcoal created or a quench base to save the charcoal for biochar or other use.
Download Part A of TChar Technology for Cookstoves at:
http://drtlud.com/

Paal Wendelobo, October, 2011

The Peko Pe TLUD project in Zambia is going well.

Paal describes it best:

" The main principals for our projects I will call it community based participation both for fuel and for stove productions. Utilization of local resources with other words.. The Peko Pe is designed for production by local tinsmith with the tools they might have. They only need a template and a model; they have the knowledge how to make it.

" First of all we discuss the need of changes, and then on the fuel side we start up with registration of alternative biomass for fuel for briquetting, energy forestry for fuel production. We always start with the fuel .to be sure there is sufficient quantities and to an affordable price.

"The charcoal business, which represents about 15 % of the adult population, has to be involved from an early stage of the project. All kind of activities on the household energy sector will in one or another way have an influence of their business, and with biochar we don’t know what will happen, but that is one of the ting we will try to find out. Any how for the charcoal business it is just to change from charcoal to alternative biomass for household energy.

"The energy loss by production of biochar for soil improvement is almost equivalent to the energy needed for the farmer to cook if you include the African way of thinking time is coming not like by us time is running That is a big difference. A household need about 2,7 kg charcoal a day for cooking. Form about 10 kg of dry wood you will get 2,7 kg of charcoal for one day cooking and no biochar. From .10 kg of dry wood you will get 10 kg of woodchips and that will be for 2 ½ day of cooking into a TLUD-ND. and about 2.7 kg of biochar. The pilot project will tell us if this is right or wrong."

" A common Miombo forest in Africa will give about 3 ton wood per ha a year. 3 ton of dry wood will give 800 kg of charcoal. A household of 5 consume 2-3 kg charcoal a day or about 800 kg a year. To produce 3 kg of charcoal you need 10-12 kg of dry fire wood in a common kiln. That will give one day cooking on a charcoal stove, and almost no biochar. 10-12kg dry chopped wood will give 3 days of cooking on a TLUD-ND or another FES and 2.5 kg of biochar
Energy forestry using just the sprouting every year can give up to 10 ton wood per ha a year, easy to cut to appropriate fuel for TLUD-ND’s or other types of FES. By adding some biochar to soil of bad quality 20-30 % increased yields can be obtained, which will give more food, more household energy, more jobs, better economy, better health for women and children and saving the forest. It can probably be as simple as this and is that not some of what we are looking for and need?
We know some changes have to take place on the household energy sector and we have to start somewhere. Why not start with small scale farmers on sandy soil, and from there develop the new household bio-energy strategy for developing countries. Probably also with the charcoal business, they have the whole infrastructure intact and can easy change from charcoal to alternative biomass like chopped wood or pellets from agriculture and forestry related waste. "

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