In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.

ublished on Dec 20, 2013

December 20, 2013

Dear Friends,
A few weeks after Typhoon Bopha (locally Pablo) struck eastern Mindanao in December 2012, I was introduced electronically to a Filipina doing graduate studies in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.. This young Filipina was fundraising for her home province of Davao Oriental in Vancouver but I was only able to contact her after she returned to Saskatoon. When she learned about the Eco-Kalan, she lamented at the thought of "so much rice donated to the typhoon victims but nothing to cook it with". Her lament has echoed in my mind ever since and has made me more determined to bring the Eco-Kalan stoves to victims of disasters wherever possible, not by ourselves, but with other organizations that can provide security, reliable transportation, food, drinking water, clothing and building supplies.

Reinforced Holey Roket Stove
Holey Roket Stove - Drawing (side)
Holey Roket Stove top view

by Joshua B. Guinto
Specialist, Sustainable Village Technologies

1 The Basic Mechanisms of the Rocket Stove. With the lessons from people like Rok Oblak, Richard Stanley and the Aprovecho Institute the author began learning to build the holey roket stove in his workshop at Daet, Camarines Norte. With sheer perseverance and amidst scarcity, he was able to create several models and delivered skills training to poor people in Camarines Norte, Sorsogon and recently in Bulacan.

2. Among the many feedbacks from the users are the limitation of the holey roket stove in terms of (1) fragility in handling and (2) capacity to receive bigger loads when cooking for bigger occasions and events and for food business. In response, one of the models was picked up for reinforcements.

3. The Innovations as of July 2013

Holey Roket Stove Double-Barell as a Fish
Holey Roket Stove as a Truck
Prototype Holey Roket on a box blatform with a Char pocket

See even more pictures at

The first two stoves in the attached i already am making since the past years. And recently, i have been teaching women and soon their husbands to also make their rocket stoves here in the province of Bulacan under a disaster preparedness program by the Save the Children International. They also make their own designs of flowers, castle towers, chess characters, and faces into their stoves.

the drawing in the third attachment is a prototype in process. It is a Holey Rocket Stove with a char pocket on the side and a box as a platform. I hope to finish it in the coming weeks.

Joshua Guinto

MIT has recently published the paper "Up in Smoke" by Rema Hanna, Ester Duflo and Michael Greenston which studies the a randomized installation of the Chullah in India. The study participants received skilled help in installing the Chullah stove and minimal help in maintaining them.

The Study is published Here:
this link is shorter

Dear all,

For over two years we have been telling people that in two weeks or so we hope to have the mud Rocket Stove website updated. It finally happened. Flip has worked countless hours on this. This morning she shouted out, "The baby is born!"

Thanks to Larry Winiarski for all the mentoring and watching over us. Without Larry and the Good Lord this would have never happened.

Happy New Year,
Jon and Flip

Practical Action, Kenya

The Upesi stove, also known as the Maendeleo has been successful in Kenya. It has two parts, a simple pottery cylinder with pot rests (known as the liner) that is built into a mud surround in the kitchen. Fuel is fed into the fire through an opening in the front of the stove, and it has no chimney, but it produces much less smoke than an open fire.

Flip and Jon Anderson,updated May, 2010

and the movie:

Flip and Jon Anderson put together a beautiful earthen oven that's powered by a Rocket stove. They've got all of the details on their picassa photo album:

They were inspired by Kiko Denzer's book Build your Own Earth Oven to build the supports with apple pruning into an inverted basket, and then mix the clay and straw to put over it. This was done on a wonderful earthenware support built on top of simple framing to elevate the oven to allow for the rocket stove underneath.

Larry Winiarski offered suggestions and tweaks to improved the efficiency of the stove, and Flip and Jon report that it makes a beautiful pan of rolls and marionberry pie, with very little wood, and can also boil water off the top of the chimney. Nicely done.

Robert V. Lange, February, 2011

Robert Lange, and the team from the ICSEE has been working in cooperation with the local Maasai leadership to bring both improved cookstoves and improved light and radio access to their people, as well as the training to install and repair their own stoves and PVC systems.

This project does a great job of teaching the women of the Maasai tribes to build their own improved rocket style stoves using local materials, and relatively small sections of steel and rebar to improve the durability of the local ceramic brick. The women are clearly proud of their new stoves, and their ability to repair, and move the stoves as needed, and even better than that - the neighbors are jealous and motivated to learn and build as well.

More information is available on their web site:

More information about the project methodology, and other ICSEE Projects can be found on the ICSEE web site:
and the Villages Project web site:


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