Charcoal briquette

[MAGH 3G]( ) is an adaptation stove. All types of biomass, briquettes and charcoal can be used for cooking. This is an all in one stove.

It was found that many families have at least two or three types of stoves in rural areas for using types of biomass as fuel. Now with just one stove they have the freedom to use all types of Biomass as fuel.

There is an option to control primary air, to control air from the fuel feed side opening, and secondary air (while using TLUD adopter). Weighs less than 2 kgs, 9 inches in height and 7 inches diameter. Most convenient for regular use, travel, relief, refugees, etc. Reusing metal sheet, these stoves are completely hand made. The cost of each stove piece is $5 (USD).

This stove is being facilitated under the "Good Stoves and Biochar Communities" Project, implemented by GEO with the support of This is one of the 40 stoves designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO . For more details visit

Save Money, Save Energy, Eat Well!

Since the introduction of our line of Cookswell Energy Efficient Charcoal Ovens in 1992, thousands of ovens have been sold regionally and countrywide, to all manner of people for all manner of uses.

TED Technology Entertainment Design, BMW, 2006

"MIT engineer Amy Smith designs ingenious low-cost devices to tackle tough problems in developing countries. She received a MacArthur "Genius" Grant in 2004, and was the first woman to win MIT's famed Lemelson Prize. In this talk, she explains the vision behind her inventions, which include eco-friendly charcoal and a laboratory incubator that doesn't require electricity. (Recorded February 2006 in Monterey, CA. Duration: 15:48)"

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A charcoal extruder made by MIT, Amy Smith et al.

Charcoal Briquette Maker
Amy Smith, D-Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Haiti is in dire need of an alternative fuel source. Currently, wood and wood-based charcoal are the primary cooking fuels in Haiti, but the country 98% deforested. Wood for charcoal is extremely scarce and demand creates soaring fuel prices and environmental devastation. With an average income of about one dollar per day, imported fuels are not a viable option.

Sarai Cooking System
Sarai Cooking System


AD Karve January 2003, REV 2006

Sarai is a stainless steam steam cooker. It is a non-pressurised cooker, into which you put about 150 ml of water and then lower into it a wire cage, which holds three cookpots, one on top of another. The steam pot has a lid which is kept closed while the food is being cooked. The heat is provided by a charcoal burner, which is designed to hold just 100 g of charcoal or a single honeycomb briquette of 100 g. After the coal has caught fire, the steam pot containing the food to be cooked is placed on the stove.

The Beehive (Honeycomb) Charcoal Briquette Stove in the Khumbu Region
Nepal, Sjoerd Nienhuys, March 18, 2003

Beehive StoveBeehive Stove

The Beehive (Honeycomb) Charcoal Briquette Stove in the Khumbu Region, Nepal, Sjoerd Nienhuys (1 800 kb pdf) March 18, 2003

The document is the result of a mission to Lukla/Mosi (8,000 ft. / 2634 m) and Khumjung (11,800 ft. / 3882 m) in the Khumbu region and contains observations about the use of the Beehive charcoal briquette stove for cooking and space heating. The Beehive charcoal briquette stove has the potential to become a practical source of renewable energy (RE) for domestic use, hotel owners and trekkers in high altitude camping grounds. Currently large amounts of kerosene is being brought into the region to satisfy the need for cooking energy and for use in Everest Base Camp.

The observations in this report are related to the potential use of biomass charcoal briquettes and improved briquette stoves at high altitudes in Nepal. With proper application of the available technology, biomass briquettes can be a means of providing a convenient source of energy for cooking and space heating, substituting the need for kerosene which is a non-renewable energy source subsidised by the Nepalese government.

The need to improve the locally manufactured biomass charcoal briquettes has been also identified by WWF Nepal Programme. The same problems in the supply of energy exist in similar high mountain regions, such as the conservation areas managed by the WWF-Nepal Programme and the King Mahendra Trust for Nature Conservation. The charcoal briquettes are manufactured from agricultural residue and forest waste products. High firewood consumption for domestic cooking and heating purposes is depleting forest reserves because at the higher altitudes, where tree growth is considerably slower than at the lower altitudes such as in the Terai, regeneration of firewood cannot meet the demands. The author looked at some of the technical, social and financial implications of the produced briquettes and stove.

See attached report.

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