Tanzania

To help encourage more people to start small business bakeries in East Africa we are proudly partnering with to offer comprehensive packages for starting up a small business. They include training on how to use a charcoal oven, baking tins, mixing bowls, business plans, internet registration and even an apron and a hat!

Classes are held just outside of Nairobi past Kikuyu or we can arrange to come to your location (in East Africa).

Learn how to bake healthy cookies, pizza, sweet potato bread, cakes, bread rolls and even roast peanuts to make peanut butter!

Contact cookswelljikos@gmail.com for more information.

I agree that burning wood and other fuels like that is not what the rural people of the world should be saddled with forever. They need the kind of cooking fuel I have.

But for now, we can really help them have healthier lives and less menial labor. There is no contradiction between helping out now with better wood stoves and knowing that their governments, central and local, must do more as quickly as possible to improve their access to good energy, water, housing and all the rest.

We are happy to bring our stove to the Maasai. We have 100% "sustained adoption" and the attached photo shows why. Yes, someday they will be much better off, we hope, and not need this sort of thing. But for now, to see Rhoda, cooking some beans with her grandchild on her lap, safe and smoke free, is a motivating image that makes us proud and happy.

Bob Lange
Maasai Stoves and Solar

http://www.forstoves.com/what-we-do/maasai-stove/
and http://internationalcollaborative.org/about-us/impact/

baking orange cake in oranges
open day baking class demonstration
tree seeds and charcoal farming demo
one of the posters

A wonderful afternoon with Susan Kamau's Kenya Kitchens Cooking Club. Susan is a Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves Ambassasdor Chef and we very pleased to partner with her to have a open afternoon at UCHUMI SUPERMARKETS LTD to hold a baking demonstration and discussion about energy conservation, clean cooking, nutritional baking as a business and of course healthy delicious eating!

Jan Bianchi, November, 2011

Promotion of stoves has formed an important part of Liana (NGO) development projects in Northern Tanzania from 2009 to 2011.

As we wanted to offer some choice of stoves to families with very differing means and needs, nine of the better documented models or locally known models were introduced to the farmers in Mwanga and Moshi in the initial theory training sessions. Following an exercise in which each farmer selected a stove type s/he would like to have and could afford to have in her/his home, the number of potentially suitable stoves was reduced. As women became more aware of the dangerous effects of indoor smoke, having a chimney became more and more important and many models without chimney dropped out.

Thus we remained with four main stove models. These are Vita metal stove, Upesi burned clay stove, Lorena mud stove (or built with bricks inside) and a rocket Brick and cement stove. During the process two of the stove models, Vita and Upesi were considerably modified. Vita obtained a short chimney (90cm measured from the middle of the hole to the top, 8x8cm) and Upesi was developed into two slightly different new models, both with a fire grate allowing air intake to the fire chamber through holes in the grate.

As part of our project Save firewood by improved stoves we assessed the stoves. The report of this assessment has the results of the boiling point tests, controlled cooking tests and an interview study on user experiences in Mwanga and Moshi.

You can access the report from the following link:
http://www.liana-ry.org/Liana_docs/Liana_stove_tests_in_tanzania_2011.pdf

Robert V. Lange, February, 2011

Robert Lange, and the team from the ICSEE has been working in cooperation with the local Maasai leadership to bring both improved cookstoves and improved light and radio access to their people, as well as the training to install and repair their own stoves and PVC systems.

This project does a great job of teaching the women of the Maasai tribes to build their own improved rocket style stoves using local materials, and relatively small sections of steel and rebar to improve the durability of the local ceramic brick. The women are clearly proud of their new stoves, and their ability to repair, and move the stoves as needed, and even better than that - the neighbors are jealous and motivated to learn and build as well.

More information is available on their web site: http://www.maasaistovessolar.org

More information about the project methodology, and other ICSEE Projects can be found on the ICSEE web site:
http://www.the-icsee.org/projects/africa/villageprojects.htm
and the Villages Project web site: http://www.villageprojectsint.org/

Yvonne Vögeli May, 2010

For those of you interested in the ARTI biogas system, please have a look at our new report on "Anaerobic Digestion of Canteen Waste at a Secondary School in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania".

After the evaluation of the ARTI system on household level, this follow-up study evaluates the suitability of the same technology applied on a bigger scale. You will find the detailed results on our website in the
"Africa"-section:
http://www.eawag.ch/organisation/abteilungen/sandec/schwerpunkte/swm/projects/anaerobic_digestion

Bjarne Laustsen, January 2010, update November, 2010

Jiko Mbono is Swahili for Jatropha Stove.

This is an early version of the stove, it is now using That stove was an early prototype. It is no longer using whole seeds but instead pellets made from the pulp left over after the pressing of jatropha oil, although there is only one pelletization facility for this in Tanzania and no distribution arrangements. Now only, the Jiko Safi uses whole seeds.
The idea is to plant jatropha as a hedge around land holdings. Animals won’t eat it and around an average holding it produces enough seed for a family’s annual fuel needs. I agree that planting it as a crop isn’t ideal

*****

Jiko Mbono was developed for burning whole Jatropha seeds.
The stove is a TLUD (Top-Lit UpDraft) gasification stove with natural draft air supply.

Earlier development of Jatropha stoves have mainly been based on the use of Jatropha oil. But the use of Jatropha oil in stoves have had some problems. In wick stoves the problem have been on the high viscosity of the oil which makes it difficult to climb wick to feed the flame, this has caused the wick material to burn. Jatropha pressurised stoves have also the problems of keeping the nozzles clean, and also the complicated design which tends to make the stoves relative expensive.

I therefore got the idea to burn the seeds directly in the stove. If the gasification process could provide the heat in the stove to vaporize out the oil from the seeds in the form of gasses, that will save us the work of first mechanically pressing the oil out of the seeds.

I therefore started some experimentation with some simple stove design, and these first experiments showed that it was possible to burn the whole seeds in a stove. Further developments was however needed to get an efficient and user friendly design of the stove.

I contacted Dr. Hassan M. Rajabu from College of Engineering & Technology at University of Dar es Salaam so that we could further develop the stove and test the stove after each modification. In this development we have received valuable economical support from the US based organisation Partners for Development and also support from Pamoja INC. Engineer F. Lauwo from Tanzania Engineering and Manufacturing Design Organisation (TEMDO) have provided assistance in producing the prototypes of the stoves.


Diagram of Jiko Mbono.

The fire in the stove is normally started by having a few crushed seeds that are soaked in methylated spirit or kerosene. These crushed seeds are placed at the top of other seeds in the fuelbox and the fire is lit in these crushed seeds.
The initial process can be started inside the stove or outside. When some seeds at the top got good flames (3-5 minutes) the fuelbox is then placed on the shelve at the bottom of the stove door and the door is closed so the fuelbox get into its position in the centre of the stove. In this initial phase the primary air is kept fully open.

The pyrolysis of the seeds by supply of primary air will gradually build up and the gasses from the pyrolysis will raise by the draft from the stoves internal chimney and be burned at the top by mixing with the secondary air.

During this gradually build up of heat the primary air supply need to be reduced such that enough secondary air can be supplied to allow for a good combustion of the gasses.

The burning of the Jatropha seeds is undertaken in batch portions. After all the seeds in the fuelbox have been pyrolysis the fuelbox need to be taken out and refilled for a new burning. It is not possible at this stage of the development of the stove to refill the fuelbox when the stove is operating, such refilling will just results in heavy smoke.

With a full load of fuel 300 – 400 gram of Jatropha seeds the stove can burn for 1 to 1½ hour when used in real cooking where the fire is somehow turned down. During test we have recorded specific fuel consumption on around 52 gram seeds per liter of boiling water, and an energy efficiency around 44%. However, the high efficiency is atributed to the design of the top part of the stove where the top is inserted in a skirt.

When operated properly the carbon in the seeds will remain as some kind of charcoal.

The use of renewable fuel is important here in Tanzania, where most of the biomass fuels are harvested in natural forests which takes year to re-grow.
We have estimated that a household having 200 – 300 meters of hedges of Jatropha trees will be able to meet their own need of fuel for the household cooking. Jatropha is often planted as hedges, it is a good hedge plant, as it is not browsed by goats, cows or other animals. Also as a hedge plant it does not compete with food crops on cultivating areas.

For urban households in Tanzania Jatropha is a viable alternative to charcoal. A farmer here gets 150 Tsh for one kg of Jatropha seeds (exchange rate 1350 to $). In town the Jatropha seeds will sell for around 300 sh. An urban household will need around 2 kg seeds per day to meet their energy need for cooking, that gives a monthly energy bill of 18,000 sh. If the same households are using charcoal it will on average consume 3 bags of 30 kg charcoal of a price of not less than 15,000 sh, this gives a monthly energy bill of minimum 45,000 sh. The use of Jatropha will in this way represent a good saving and alternative to fuelwood and charcoal.

Other seeds and crop wates can also be used in the stove. We know that seeds from the Croton tree burns well so does Castor seeds. We have also tried and found that the shells from cashew nut burn well in the stove. These shells are mainly a waste product from small-scale Cashew nut processing plants which are scattered in regions growing cashew trees.. We also believe that other seeds such as the oil palm kernel could also burn well when cracked a little. There will likely be many other oil holding seeds that could be used in such a stove.

Singida Stoves: Searching for Advice on Concrete Stoves Klavs Heeboell, Danish Tanzanian Friendship Association (Dantan), Singida,Tanzania,March 28, 2009

Singida Stoves
Singida StovesSingida Stoves

At long last a short description with pictures of the kind of stoves on the agenda of Shina Group in corporation with a few members of the Danish Tanzanian Friendship Association (http://dantan.dk). I hope this will do for initial comments and ideas. The aim of the project is as in many developing countries to reduce the use of firewood and minimize smoke in the kitchen thereby improving the health of the cook and her children. We shall be most pleased to receive advice and ideas.

Klavs Heeboell

klavsheeboell@hotmail.com See letter attached with pictures and text.

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