Indonesia

B/S/H BSH Bosch und Siemens Hausgeräte GmbH has decided to continue the Protos plant oil cookstoves that they had been working on in Indonesia, and instead made the technology publicly available for commercial manufacturers:
http://www.bsh-group.com/index.php?12765

The family of plant oil stoves, including the Protos stoves, were designed to be safe, and reliable cookstoves for low income residents of Indonesia. BSH found that despite having a lot of plant oil available, there was no reliable network of distribution of that oil, and it was keeping users from being able to use the stove. The plant oil stoves also require a lot more cleaning and maintenance than kerosene stoves. Between the difficulty in getting fuel, and the additional maintenance, it was difficult to expand the stove project beyond the initial pilot projects, and BSH eventually concluded that this project was unfeasible.

There's more detail on their web site: http://www.bsh-group.com/index.php?109906

Muhammad Nurhuda from the Physics Department, Brawijaya University
in Malang, Indonesia

They have developed a various biomass stoves ( Kompor Biomass ) The fuels also vary from chopped woods/twigs, pellet, palm kernel shell, hazelnut kernel shell, corncob, etc..

And they have a nice collection of YouTube videos:

All stoves presented above are of TLUD types, but the combustion is improved by using pre-heating and counter-flow burning mechanism. The one intended for palm kernel shell utilizes diffused-combustion mechanism, in addition to pre-heating and counter flow mechanism.

The latest one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b70z9-0nK6E

is devoted for institutional cook stove or small restaurants.

Very recently, we have also developed a new rocket stove. The combustion in this new rocket stove is improved by introducing counter-flow burning mechanism.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kID0YL6TyqA

Jolentho in javanese (a local language in Indonesia) means rounded and bulky, so Jolentho Stove means bulky and rounded stove. We gave it the name because the stove liner is made of round and bulky potteries. Every part of the liner is made from pottery, including the grate.

The liner is divided into 8 parts to simplify production and tranportation. To make a liner, one needs to have pottery making skill. For simplicity, the liner is produced by a professional pottery maker. The users only need to buy, install and cast a sand-cement mixture surround the liner. Although cement are not ressistant to heat (easily crumbles), pottery liner provide protection so that cement can last longer. Properly made, the stove will last for 10 years.

The stove has 3 potholes and a chimney to suit the needs of palm sugar producers in Indonesia. The technology is simple: fuelwood burns above grate. Grate provide air suppy and dispose ash. The enclosed combustion chamber provides improved combustion quality. After heating the pot in hole #1 rom beneath, hot smoke is channeled to pothole #2 and #3. There are baffles in pothole #2 and #3 to maximize heat transfer. Finally, the smoke exits through chimney. Chimney also provide draft that boosts combustion.
The innovations we offer are cost and time efficiency and simplicity in stove making, and. It only takes 1 men, 2 hours and 19.25 USD to make a Jolentho Stove and the stove is ready to use within 3 days. This is much more simpler, compared to a mud stove, which requires 4 men, 16 USD and 3 days only to make mud stove and additionally 17 days to get mud stove ready to cook. By all means, the Jolentho is much more favorable.

Alexis Belonio, Bima Tahar, and Bonny Minang

A super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove was recently developed in Indonesia to provide households with an affordable clean-burning cooking device using rice husks as fuel.

Within the 3 years of development on rice husk gasifier stove, PT Minang Jordanindo Approtech has finally come up with the super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove carrying a selling price of US$10 to 15, which is very much cheaper as compared with the previous model with a selling price of US$20. With this development, consumers don’t need to amortize for the stove, as what is currently practiced in villages in Indonesia, for them to acquire a unit of the stove in order for them to save money on fuel. Moreover, this stove is now made available to end users at a low cost, freeing the distributors from the task of devising financing schemes just to make the technology affordable to the local households.

As shown, the stove consists of only few parts. It was designed and made so simple to maximize the use of materials and to simplify the production using locally available resources. This stove model has the following basic parts: (a) the casing is made of tin can and can be bought at a very low price from a Can Factory; (b) the reactor can be subcontracted from a sheet metal manufacturer as well as the stove cover
and the burner; (c) the fan, which uses DC 12 volt, 2 watt supplies the required air to gasify rice husks. The flame coming out of the burner is bluish in color, which indicates a very clean gas. It has low black carbon emission of about 50 ug/m3 and below. The CO2 emission is about 0.6 kg CO2 per kg rice husks.

An Update from BSH on Protos. The Plant Oil Stove.
Samuel N. Shiroff, Director, BSH

For a brief update BSH is preparing a mass production capacity that should come on-line in late autumn of this year. Initial production will be ramped up through Q4 so we can expect to produce several thousand units in 2009. We are working with a local Indonesian partner - in an OEM process with 100% local content. This is part of our goal, but since BSH is not present in any meaningful way in our conventional business in that country, it is a very new activity for us. Thus, the time line may be subject to delay if quality or other issues arise. I would rather delay a few weeks than deliver a defective product.

The initial cost is going to be around US$40 - 42 Ex-works. This means it does not include transport or tolls if moving outside of Indonesia. Our total capacity for 2010 should be around 50,000 units - so this price will hopefully edge down. Naturally currency fluctuations will also play a role. BSH is running the project as a "social business". This means our goal is simply to cover costs and any additional profit will be put back into the project - for instance subsidizing costs in countries where there is viability, but not enough purchasing power for the capital costs. The mentioned price is the cost of production and local overhead. No more. Larger orders do not generate greater discounts. At first all orders will be filled out of Indonesia. New production capacity requires a minimum annual demand of 25,000 units and a viable infrastructure in the desired region. With perhaps the exception of the tank and some cleaning tools, it is simply not possible to establish small-scale local production that ensures consistent quality in an economically viable manner.

INVERTED-DOWNDRAFT COAL GASIFIER FOR SMALL SCALE INDUSTRY THERMAL APPLICATION
Alexis Belonio, Daniel Belonio, Fraciscus Tria Garleman, Bima Tahar, and Djoewito Atmowidjojo
Minang Jordanindo Approtech, November 2008

Coal Gasifier
Gasifier With Jet Burner

Fuel source for small-scale industry heating application is becoming expensive. This is more so for food, grain, and other processing industries in Indonesia where the energy sources for various processes are highly dependent on conventional fuel. At present, the cost of LPG went up to IDR 7,000 per kg while kerosene and diesel to as high as IDR 12,000 and IDR 5,500 per liter, respectively.

SMALL-SCALE INDUSTRY COAL GASIFIER STOVE FOR FRYING FOOD PRODUCTS
Alexis Belonio, Daniel Belonio, Franciscus Tria Garleman, and Djoewito Atmowidjojo
Minang Jordanindo Approtech, Jakarta Selatan, Indonesia, November 2008

Cookstove System Save80
LUSAKA SUSTAINABLE ENERGY PROJECT and COOK STOVE PROJECT KUPANG
Climate Interchange AG,Garching/Munich, Germany, July 2008
Cookstove Save80Cookstove Save80

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