maize cobs

We are trying to (a) reduce the amount of emmisisons from charcoal production and (b) Condense and recover as much of the smoke into a usable product for your home/farm. Wood tar - the following is an explanation from the good folks at Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) about what is going on in this process.
"The non-water component consists of wood tars, both water soluble and insoluble, acetic acid, methanol, acetone and other complex chemicals in small amounts. If left to stand, the proligneous acid separates into two layers comprising the water insoluble tar and a watery layer containing the remaining chemicals. Recovery of the water insoluble tar, often called wood or Stockholm tar, is simple - it is merely decanted from the water phase. This wood tar has uses as a veterinary antiseptic, a preservative for wood, a caulking agent, and as a substitute for road tar" http://www.fao.org/docrep/x5328e/x5328e0d.htm

For more pictures click here

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A loaded kinyanjui type barrel kiln carbonizing maize cobs
free fuel!
a full kin of maize cob and branch charcoal made in less the a day
the maize cob charcoal cooks with high heat and little smoke.

Four very good reasons why to make your own charcoal from dry maize cobs.

  1. They are FREE!! (minimal processing required and are widely available as a farm waste product)
  2. Maize cob charcoal is very easy to make and leaves few charcoal fines. (no need for expensive briquetting)
  3. They are easy to light and burn very hot with little ash and are perfect for cooking a quick meal.
  4. Using maize cob charcoal means ZERO reliance on tree's and forests, LPG gas or unreliable and expensive electricity supplies for your cooking fuel needs. And with a Cookswell Jiko you can bake, boil, roast and toast all of your favorite foods
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