Gasifier (microgasification)

Tom Miles, ETHOS Conference 2011
Kirkland, Washington, USA January 28th ~ 30th, 2011

The ETHOS Stoves Conference was last weekend, and it included demonstrations by some of the stove makers and manufactures, with the opportunity to talk to the people using and inventing the stoves.

Here are some of the stand-outs from the demonstrations area, click on an image to view it in a larger size.

The Shark Stove presented by John and Flip Anderson. Notice the even cooking on the pancakes, that even heat is partially due the ceramic shark teeth construction just under the cooking surface. This is primarily a stick burning stove with both a plancha (even cooking surface) and pot rests.

Jatropha Seed TLUD (Top, lit, updraft design, using natural draft - no fan) by
Pamoja (http://www.pamoja.net/protree_jatropha.html) and Jet City Stoveworks ( http://jetcitystoveworks.com/ ). Abely demonstrated by David Otto.

Paul Anderson dexterously burning Jatropha seeds (out of doors) in the Woodgas Stove ( http://woodgas.com/bookSTOVE.htm ) designed by Tom Reed. This is a light weight gasifying stove (minus the pot rest in the picture) that uses a small electric fan.
Boiling water in the Charbelle, presented by Peter Scott. The Charbelle is a Charcoal cooking stove designed by the Burn Design Lab ( http://www.burndesignlab.org/our-stoves/ ) for use in Haiti.

This stove features an abrasion and thermal shock resistant ceramic liner surrounded by sheet metal cladding. The stove is currently being mass produced and sold in Kenya. The stove has been very well received, earning top marks from consumers.



Ryan with StoveTec was demonstrating the StoveTec Stove ( http://www.stovetec.net/us/ ) an Ashden Award winning cook stove that can either be used with stick wood or charcoal.

The institutional version of the StoveTec Stove for use in schools and other organizations, has an attached chimney and an a pressure cooker version. The pressure cooker is useful to shorten cooking times, and the fuel consumption, when cooking beans and small grains.

The Nomad PrePac ( http://www.preppac.net/ ) Bio-fuel Camp Stove burning stick wood. This is an ultra-light stove designed to burn small amounts of fuel for camping or for emergency preparedness.

the PEMS emissions testing was happening at ETHOS (of course), Larry Winiarski is in the background in these pictures.

Art Donnelly, December, 2010

Mas que Cafe (on YouTube)

(Produced, shot and edited by Majo Calderon & Carlos Herrera
http://www.biodieseldiaries.com )

**I am looking to get some Anila stove units in India for some small-scale trials http://biocharinnovation.wordpress.com/ - if you can help please get in touch asap with sarah.carter [at] ed.ac.uk**

Testing of the Sampanda stove in Cambodia 12.07.2010
Sarah Carter, UK Biochar Research Centre

See http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-andersons-tl for a similar test on Anderson's TLUD, and http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-everythingni for testing of EverythingNice stove, and Anila stove http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-anila-stove.

Stove: Sampanda stove. Produced by the [Samuchit Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd](http://www.samuchit.com/) in India.
Test: A water boiling test (time to boil 2.5 litres of water, in a pan without a lid)
Location: The Iron Workshop, Siem Reap. A well ventilated building – 2 surrounding walls, and a roof. Wind conditions were low, but blustery at times.

Testing of the Anila stove in Cambodia 03.05.2010
Sarah Carter and Vichida Tan, UK Biochar Research Centre

See http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-andersons-tl for a similar test on Anderson's TLUD, and http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-everythingni for testing of EverythingNice stove.

Paul Olivier, April 2010

Today we put in operation for the first time the 250 gasifier with a stove top.
This gasifier has a single 2-inch pipe that vents housing air to a warmer grate.
This pipe had no butterfly valve or other restriction.
We used the same small 80x80 mm fan as in the 150 gasifier.
This fan had no problem at all supplying air to the reactor and to the 2-inch pipe.
The burn lasted almost an hour on rice hulls, even though the height of the reactor was no more than 70 cm, the same height as in the case of the 150 stove.
The warmer grate had sufficient heat from the housing to fry an egg, as indicated in picture 855.
We obtained a bright blue flame, as shown in picture 865,
although the camera did not have the right lighting to display it properly.
The stove top was not properly reinforced when a large pot filled with water was placed on top.
There was a deflection of a few mm's.
However this can be easily remedied with two more lateral braces underneath the stove top.
In conclusion, the 250 gasifier works well and delivers an enormous amount of heat.

TLUD Vesto Grasifier
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, Swaziland, April 2, 2010


Dear Roger and TLUD Fans (the other kind)

Andrew Ma, March 11, 2010

Minimalist, most accessible and, lightest wood gas stove I've seen or built so far. (But got a few more ideas). Credit goes to WorldStove and its Everything Nice Stove design.

Instructions

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Roger Samson, February 2010

Please click Read More for a set of photos showing the construction of a prototype 125 mm diameter Grasifier Stove burning Switchgrass Pellets provided by Roger Samson (REAP-Canada).

Paul Anderson, February 21, 2010

For the first time at one Internet location, the basics of "Top-Lit UpDraft" (TLUD) micro-gasification are available along with numerous links to source documents. This "TLUD Handbook" is a "draft for
discussion" and this is the 2010 copy of the Handbook.

Paul

Paul S Anderson, Ph.D. -- aka Dr. TLUD ("Dr. Tee-lud")
Biomass Energy Consultant with BEF, & Partner in Chip Energy.
Specialist in micro-gasification.
Office & Res: 309-452-7072
www.chipenergy.com
http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/andersontludconstruction

File attachments: 

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Roger Samson, January 2010

GrasifierGrasifier

Roger Samson was here tonight and we made and tested a Grasifier: a Switchgrass burning stove based on the dimensions of the Vesto adapted to make a lower cost pellet burning stove for Haiti.

Power, 2.5 kw
Burn rate 8-10 g/min
Mass 550 g
Fuel load 600 g though it can hold 750

Lighted with two caps of paint thinners
The flame went completely blue (just before the end) then wobbled a lot and went out.
When it went out there was no smoke indicating there were no volatiles left.

Time to fabricate, about 30 minutes.

I see this as a burner that can be attached to the centre of a Haitian charcoal stove to convert it into very clean burning a pellet stove.

Char yield: 25% of the initial dry mass.
Moisture content of the initial fuel, about 7%

Ash: nearly none.

Regards
Crispin

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