Microenterprise

  2  FUELS FOR  I STOVE:    COCONUT SHELL CHARCOAL  OR  WOOD (IPIL-IPIL) (Leucaena  leuco
In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
Demonstration
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.

baking orange cake in oranges
open day baking class demonstration
tree seeds and charcoal farming demo
one of the posters

A wonderful afternoon with Susan Kamau's Kenya Kitchens Cooking Club. Susan is a Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves Ambassasdor Chef and we very pleased to partner with her to have a open afternoon at UCHUMI SUPERMARKETS LTD to hold a baking demonstration and discussion about energy conservation, clean cooking, nutritional baking as a business and of course healthy delicious eating!

A loaded kinyanjui type barrel kiln carbonizing maize cobs
free fuel!
a full kin of maize cob and branch charcoal made in less the a day
the maize cob charcoal cooks with high heat and little smoke.

Four very good reasons why to make your own charcoal from dry maize cobs.

  1. They are FREE!! (minimal processing required and are widely available as a farm waste product)
  2. Maize cob charcoal is very easy to make and leaves few charcoal fines. (no need for expensive briquetting)
  3. They are easy to light and burn very hot with little ash and are perfect for cooking a quick meal.
  4. Using maize cob charcoal means ZERO reliance on tree's and forests, LPG gas or unreliable and expensive electricity supplies for your cooking fuel needs. And with a Cookswell Jiko you can bake, boil, roast and toast all of your favorite foods
File attachments: 

Biocharproject.org announces the stumpy biochar combination cooker.

Its a tlud its a rocket stove it has many applications and fully customisable.
Simple design utilises waste LPG tanks to provide safe efficent cheap cooking.

Designed and Made in Australia by Biochar Project and Labrador Mens shed.

See the complete story on http://biocharproject.org

Open source free design

the Partnership for Clean Indoor Air (PCIA) December, 2011

PCIA Bulletin Issue 29
http://www.pciaonline.org/bulletin/pcia-bulletin-issue-29

This Bulletin focuses fuels for clean burning stoves. As they note, a lot of effort has been focused on wood burning stoves, but in urban areas, stick wood is hard to come by, and charcoal is a much more popular fuel. There's a good reason for this, studies have shown that charcoal stoves have up to 90% less indoor air pollution than similar wood stoves. In urban areas, there is a noticeable improvement in indoor air quality simply by shifting to charcoal burning. Additionally, biomass fuel briquettes, pellets, and other densified paper burning stoves are showing a lot of promise in urban areas so this bulletin profiles projects that use urban waste to create fuel briquettes that can be sold to stove owners.

http://www.pciaonline.org/bulletin/pcia-bulletin-issue-29

Paal Wendelobo, October, 2011

The Peko Pe TLUD project in Zambia is going well.

Paal describes it best:

" The main principals for our projects I will call it community based participation both for fuel and for stove productions. Utilization of local resources with other words.. The Peko Pe is designed for production by local tinsmith with the tools they might have. They only need a template and a model; they have the knowledge how to make it.

" First of all we discuss the need of changes, and then on the fuel side we start up with registration of alternative biomass for fuel for briquetting, energy forestry for fuel production. We always start with the fuel .to be sure there is sufficient quantities and to an affordable price.

"The charcoal business, which represents about 15 % of the adult population, has to be involved from an early stage of the project. All kind of activities on the household energy sector will in one or another way have an influence of their business, and with biochar we don’t know what will happen, but that is one of the ting we will try to find out. Any how for the charcoal business it is just to change from charcoal to alternative biomass for household energy.

"The energy loss by production of biochar for soil improvement is almost equivalent to the energy needed for the farmer to cook if you include the African way of thinking time is coming not like by us time is running That is a big difference. A household need about 2,7 kg charcoal a day for cooking. Form about 10 kg of dry wood you will get 2,7 kg of charcoal for one day cooking and no biochar. From .10 kg of dry wood you will get 10 kg of woodchips and that will be for 2 ½ day of cooking into a TLUD-ND. and about 2.7 kg of biochar. The pilot project will tell us if this is right or wrong."

" A common Miombo forest in Africa will give about 3 ton wood per ha a year. 3 ton of dry wood will give 800 kg of charcoal. A household of 5 consume 2-3 kg charcoal a day or about 800 kg a year. To produce 3 kg of charcoal you need 10-12 kg of dry fire wood in a common kiln. That will give one day cooking on a charcoal stove, and almost no biochar. 10-12kg dry chopped wood will give 3 days of cooking on a TLUD-ND or another FES and 2.5 kg of biochar
Energy forestry using just the sprouting every year can give up to 10 ton wood per ha a year, easy to cut to appropriate fuel for TLUD-ND’s or other types of FES. By adding some biochar to soil of bad quality 20-30 % increased yields can be obtained, which will give more food, more household energy, more jobs, better economy, better health for women and children and saving the forest. It can probably be as simple as this and is that not some of what we are looking for and need?
We know some changes have to take place on the household energy sector and we have to start somewhere. Why not start with small scale farmers on sandy soil, and from there develop the new household bio-energy strategy for developing countries. Probably also with the charcoal business, they have the whole infrastructure intact and can easy change from charcoal to alternative biomass like chopped wood or pellets from agriculture and forestry related waste. "

This presentation is about Social Innovations - design and dissemination this focus on undeserved markets. With examples of Good Stoves design and Biochar.

Jolentho in javanese (a local language in Indonesia) means rounded and bulky, so Jolentho Stove means bulky and rounded stove. We gave it the name because the stove liner is made of round and bulky potteries. Every part of the liner is made from pottery, including the grate.

The liner is divided into 8 parts to simplify production and tranportation. To make a liner, one needs to have pottery making skill. For simplicity, the liner is produced by a professional pottery maker. The users only need to buy, install and cast a sand-cement mixture surround the liner. Although cement are not ressistant to heat (easily crumbles), pottery liner provide protection so that cement can last longer. Properly made, the stove will last for 10 years.

The stove has 3 potholes and a chimney to suit the needs of palm sugar producers in Indonesia. The technology is simple: fuelwood burns above grate. Grate provide air suppy and dispose ash. The enclosed combustion chamber provides improved combustion quality. After heating the pot in hole #1 rom beneath, hot smoke is channeled to pothole #2 and #3. There are baffles in pothole #2 and #3 to maximize heat transfer. Finally, the smoke exits through chimney. Chimney also provide draft that boosts combustion.
The innovations we offer are cost and time efficiency and simplicity in stove making, and. It only takes 1 men, 2 hours and 19.25 USD to make a Jolentho Stove and the stove is ready to use within 3 days. This is much more simpler, compared to a mud stove, which requires 4 men, 16 USD and 3 days only to make mud stove and additionally 17 days to get mud stove ready to cook. By all means, the Jolentho is much more favorable.

Gustavo Pena, Stove Team International
and Larry Winiarski

This is a Hybrid Combustion Rocket, TLUD stove designed for practical use with the help of Larry Winiarski, and with Gustavo Peña of Stove Team International.

See also:

Alexis Belonio, Bima Tahar, and Bonny Minang

A super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove was recently developed in Indonesia to provide households with an affordable clean-burning cooking device using rice husks as fuel.

Within the 3 years of development on rice husk gasifier stove, PT Minang Jordanindo Approtech has finally come up with the super low-cost, blue-flame rice husk gas stove carrying a selling price of US$10 to 15, which is very much cheaper as compared with the previous model with a selling price of US$20. With this development, consumers don’t need to amortize for the stove, as what is currently practiced in villages in Indonesia, for them to acquire a unit of the stove in order for them to save money on fuel. Moreover, this stove is now made available to end users at a low cost, freeing the distributors from the task of devising financing schemes just to make the technology affordable to the local households.

As shown, the stove consists of only few parts. It was designed and made so simple to maximize the use of materials and to simplify the production using locally available resources. This stove model has the following basic parts: (a) the casing is made of tin can and can be bought at a very low price from a Can Factory; (b) the reactor can be subcontracted from a sheet metal manufacturer as well as the stove cover
and the burner; (c) the fan, which uses DC 12 volt, 2 watt supplies the required air to gasify rice husks. The flame coming out of the burner is bluish in color, which indicates a very clean gas. It has low black carbon emission of about 50 ug/m3 and below. The CO2 emission is about 0.6 kg CO2 per kg rice husks.

Pages

Subscribe to Microenterprise