GATLANG VILLAGE , Rasuwa, NEPAL: Me, My Children and the Killer SMOKE
Pawan Shrestha, Nepal November 3, 2006

Dear All,

Thank you for your time in reviewing our Attachment. Please Check the Attachment about the killer smoke in a remote village of Nepal.

Gatlang VillageGatlang Village
File attachments: 

Installation of Improved Metal Cooking Stoves in the Khumbu Region: Field Visit Reports (3)
Sustainable Technology Adaptive Research and Implementation Center, Nepal Sjoerd Nienhuys, SNV-Nepal January 2005

Khumbu Metal StovesKhumbu Metal Stoves

Attached reports:
(1 of 3)
(2 of 3)
(3 of 3)

The majority of people in Nepal live in rural areas (88%). From the total energy requirements of the country, the rural areas account for 80%, mainly used for cooking. Almost all rural energy consumption (98%) is from traditional biomass resources, such as fuel wood, agricultural residues and animal dung. Accessibility to the electric grid by rural people is very limited, while LPG gas and kerosene oil in the high altitude and remote areas is relatively costly due to the high cost of
transport. Therefore, people living in remote areas depend heavily on forest resources to meet their demand for cooking energy.

In high altitude areas fuel wood is needed for cooking and space heating; the amount increasing with the altitude and colder temperatures. This results in continuous forest degradation, nutrient depletion from soils (by burning agro waste and cow dung), low agricultural outputs and soil
erosion. Together, these aspects result in a further reduction of accessibility to fuel wood.

File attachments: 

Cooking Stove Improvements: Design for Remote High Altitude Areas Dolpa Region Nepal, Sjoerd Nienhuys April 2005

Metal and mud cooking stoves are analysed in Dolpa, a remote high altitude district in Nepal (over 2000m) where poor firewood efficiency of cooking stoves has been observed whilst the area is already largely deforested. Current metal or mud stoves have the air-intake above the firewood, lowering gas temperatures and causing incomplete combustion. More than 20 improvement options are presented in a table. These lead to higher burning temperatures, reduced firewood consumption and lesser soot development. Modifications have been made to lower manufacturing costs. The paper briefly explains the principles of the improvements and provides detailed sketches of the solutions. Improved cooking efficiency requires chopping of the firewood into
small pieces, but the additional time spent is balanced against the considerably less time spent in the collection of firewood. The prototype stove has been field-tested and modified several times to produce a model that is easy to manufacture and is acceptable to the villagers.

Information is based on the author’s personal experience and technical information from the stoves discussion group at

Subscribe to STARIC-N