Institutional

IFB stainless liner school rocket stove
IFB stainless liner school rocket stove skirt detail

On a recent trip to Haiti, I completed the first prototype of a new school rocket stove. This one has a 26 ga 330 stainless steel firebox liner, 2½" insulating firebrick walls, and galvanized steel outer shell. The skirt is 304 stainless inside, 1" ceramic fiber in the skirt floor and walls, and galvanized steel outer. The mouth and firebox are 6½" x 6½". The pot is 40 qts with the top diameter about 1/4" larger than the diameter near the bottom, and is imported. The locally available spherical bottom pots made skirt construction extremely difficult. We hope to someday produce this stove in quantity at a combined vocational school/stove factory.

sink charcoal stove
rebar inverted pyramid charcoal stove

The inverted pyramid rebar stove is ubiquitous in Haiti. Lots of radiation and convection away from the pot. No air control. Pot is often placed directly on the charcoal which quenches the charcoal and interferes with good radiative heat transfer.
I cut up a scrap stainless steel kitchen sink, built a sheet metal outer box, put in 1" of ceramic fiber board insulation, and added legs and pot supports. The inverted pyramid grate will have the legs shortened and be placed inside the "sink". A slide gate with sets of progressively smaller holes will be added to the "drain" for air control.

Institutional Stove Solutions - InStove

Aprovecho's larger stoves - the instiutional stoves group, have now branched out and become

Institutional Stove Solutions (inStove)

http://instove.org/

They are using the same rocket stove, and have perfected a 60L stove for institutional stove.

They are focusing on schools and other institutions, and have attached an autoclave for hospital and clinic use.

They've found a way to do "Stove factory in a Box", and have perfected a way to build the stove with local labor, and with all tools provided in the factory box and requires only a small generator to operate long term.

From GEO BIOCHAR STOVE
From GEO BIOCHAR STOVE

* About 30% biochar production
* 3 to 4 days for a batch of charcoal production
* Continuous hot water access (pot 1)
* Highly suitable for institutional cooking and as well making biochar
* Additional heat generated by flaring the pyrolysis gases, used for cooking
* Mitigation of the emissions during the pyrolysis by flaring
* Costs about Rs. 3000 for a 2’ width x 5’ depth x 6’ hight (in feet) “GEO Biochar pit stove”. (cost including, tin sheet for cover, digging the pit, three pot stove and chimney.)

*_"GEO BIOCHAR STOVE" is designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, CEO, GEO. Demonstrated to farmers under the project Good Stoves and Biochar Communities Project, being supported by GoodPlanet.org, France

Quoting "Prof. S.C. Bhattacharya" :

Dear all,

I would be happy to share some publications arising from the following
activities at the Asian Institute of Technology:
1. Sida funded Regional project: An information package (including
construction details) on biomass briquetting machines developed in a
number of Asian countries and design of natural- cross-draft gasifier stoves that can operate continuously is available. The briquetting machines developed
were improvements on standard screw-press heated die design. Cross-flow
gasifier stoves were designed for different sizes; these do not need any
blower and can operate continuously without any smoke.

The briquetting and gasifier stove work I mentioned was carried out under a
Sida-sponsored project at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT). The
project involved researchers from 12 national research institutes of six
Asian countries, e.g., Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines and
Vietnam. The findings of the project were disseminated through national
dissemination seminars in these countries; published "Technology packages"
were distributed widely in the region and are still available for
downloading from the project website. We organized technology transfer
workshops, in which a number of NGOs form the region were invited, on most
of the technologies developed.

(There is no restriction on distribution of the technology packages.)

Unfortunately, the link of the project is not working due to heavy flood in
Thailand; AIT appears to be still under 2 m of water.

2. GTZ funded project on Biocoal: We used the term "Biocoal" (rather than
"Biochar") for charcoal produced from solid organic residues such as
agricultural residues and waste wood. The findings of the project were
reported in a book titled "Biocoal Technology and Economics" by "Regional
Energy Resources Information Center (RERIC)" (email:enreric@ait.ac.th).

The chapters of the 495-page book were:

  • 1. State of the art of biocoal technology,
  • 2. Biocoal technology: A comparison of options and recommendations,
  • 3. Carbonisation of sawdust briquettes,
  • 4. Laboratory-scale batch carbonisation selected residues,
  • 5. Cost and availability of selected residues in Thailand,
  • 6. Characterisation of selected residues,
  • 7.Biocoal: Market requirements and Opportunities in Thailand, and 8. Economics of biocoal production in Thailand.

A few copies of the book are still available with RERIC. A number of
chapters of the book were summarised as journal articles; I will be happy
to
share some of these with interested persons for their personal use and
research purpose.

Other technology packages and published papers of the Sida project can be downloaded from www.retsasia.ait.ac.th. The biomass/stove group may be interested the package on drying, which includes a hybrid drier using solar energy and bioenergy from a gasifier stove, heat output of which could be automatically controlled by using a thermostat.

I also coordinated another regional project (Asian Regional Research Programme in Energy, Environment and Climate, ARRPEEC) funded by Sida in three phases during 1995-2005. One of the 4 projects of ARRPEEC was on biomass. Dissemination booklets of ARRPEEC and some of the papers published can be downloaded from http://www.arrpeec.ait.ac.th

Gustavo Pena, Stove Team International
and Larry Winiarski

This is a Hybrid Combustion Rocket, TLUD stove designed for practical use with the help of Larry Winiarski, and with Gustavo Peña of Stove Team International.

See also:

A charcoal oven in the kitchen of the Karen Blixen Camp, Maasai Mara.

They use it because it;
a) saves alot of money on buying LPG (fossil fuel)
b) cooks food really really well!

And it only uses a handfull of charcoal thanks to insulation and the ceramic liner!

to buy one please see

www.kenyacharcoal.blogspot.com

we also offer international shipping

Alazar Tesfay, April, 2010

Currently, we are developing high power improved stoves for institutions.The key features of the design is adopted based on the household stoves developed and promoted by Debesai Ghebrehiwet in Eritrea. It lifts the fire chamber off the ground so the air can flow underneath through the perforated fire grates which held the fire chamber that increases the combustion efficiency and retains heat while raising the cooking pot to the hottest point above the flame. We got a fantastic result from the heat transfer efficiency point of view. But we faced a problem in Controlling the smoke which passes by the sides between the pot and the walls of the fire chamber. Do you have any idea how we can control such situations with out buying additional materials like Pot skirt.

Paul Anderson, 2009 SeaChar Stoves Workshop

The efforts at SeaChar (Seattle Biochar Initiative) produced a 5-gallon (22-liter) TLUD.

"On Saturday, August 1, Seachar hosted Dr. Paul Anderson (Dr. TLUD) for an all-day workshop in the construction of Top-Lit Up Draft (TLUD) cookstoves. The stoves can quickly be constructed from commonly available materials, and produce charcoal while providing heat for cooking (or other uses). Paul’s TLUD stoves have been tested and shown to produce very low emissions of CO and particulates. The stoves can provide benefits wherever people rely on biomass for cooking. TLUD stoves use a wide variety of small pieces of biomass for fuel. The clean burn greatly improves indoor air quality compared with open burning and many other types of stoves. In addition, the charcoal can be used as biochar to improve soil fertility, sequester carbon, and potentially provide a source of income through carbon credits."

For More See: http://seachar.org/wordpress/?p=176

The focus was for making biochar, but this size of TLUD will be highly appropriate of institutional-size cookstoves in the developing countries.

File attachments: 

Interesting story from Malawi on the use of institutional Rocket Stoves
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, May 31, 2007

Nkolokti 120L Pots
Nkolokti 120L Pots

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