Rocket

Production of Sixbricks Rocket Stoves in Uganda and Darfur 2006
Ken Goyer, AidAfrica, International Lifeline Fund, November 12, 2006

Dear Tom,

I believe that so far, with Mathew and All Nations Christian Care, we have made about 15,000 SixBricks Rocket Stoves in the Lira, (north) Uganda refugee camps . I have 2,700 numbered pictures of these stoves, with the owner, her house, the flag of the Rotary Club of East Fresno and the number of the stove. Taking pictures has proven to be more difficult and more elusive than actually making the stoves. I hope to show these pictures at our ETHOS conference this year. Dan Wolf of the International Lifeline Fund has taken over this project in Lira and plans to fund 100,000 more stoves as well as to fund and run the project in Darfur camps to build a targeted 100,000 stoves there.

Meanwhile, I have started a new stove project in Gulu, (north) Uganda to make an unlimited number of Six Bricks Rocket Stoves in the Gulu refugee camps, in addition to teach stove building in Northern Uganda. AidAfrica is also working with Rotary Clubs in Southern Uganda to make about 1000 stoves for each of thirty Adopt a Village projects.

So this coming year will be even more exciting than last year.
AidAfrica now has an office and staff in Gulu and we plan to send volunteers from here to Gulu (and other parts of Uganda) to build stoves, start a reforestation project, address the problem of malaria and continue with the medical project which has directly saved very many lives.

Much thanks to you for running the stoves list. It has been instrumental to bringing the world closer together.

Best regards, Ken Goyer

The First Sixbricks Rocket Stove in Darfur
Ken Goyer, AID Africa, Dan Wolf, International Lifeline Fund,September 4, 2006

Yesterday we had our first demonstration of the SixBricks Rocket stove in North Darfur. We had successfully fired about 1,000 of our special lightweight bricks using a local brickmaker, and now we have now started to show off the stove. Our first demonstration was a huge success. While the demonstration was intended to show the stove to a few nonprofit organizations, about 100 women came and took over the cooking action.The local staple food, aceda, was made in the largest round bottomed pot and then meat and sauces were cooked in other pots. The surprise was that after cooking this large and rather complicated meal, two thirds of it was handed over the fence and spirited away into a hut where some men were gathered. So the women were left with very little to taste. None the less they were very happy with the performance of the stove.

The political situation here remains touchy and for various reasons we will not travel to Kebkabia. Instead, we will stay here and work in El Fasher for now. Next, we hope to start a demonstration stove project in a camp which is actually a part of El Fasher. This way, access is easier, and it is safer, and still there are 32,000 people there, desperate for fuel with no trees in sight. Traveling even to the closest outside camp requires permits and permission and some worry about personal security or at least the theft of your vehicle by various rebel groups.

I have attached two photos to this email. The first one is of the stove and the second one is looking the other way at the crowd. Dan Wolf, founder and director of the International Lifeline Fund, and the benefactor of this project, has decided to rename the stove the "Miracle" Stove. I told him that it should be called the "Science" Stove, but that name just doesn't have quite the same ring.

Thanks to everybody who has made the invention and development and dissemination of this stove possible. The fruits of our labor are about to ripen.

Best regards, Ken Goyer

Aprovecho / ProBEC Ashden Awards Video available On-Line
Jeremy Roth, Aprovecho

Fuel Efficient Wood Stoves and Hayboxes: Efficiency of Combustion, Operator Expertise, and Heat Transfer Efficiency (1996)
By Dean Still, Jim Kness, Bradley Billetsen, Gabriel Cox, Michael Espenan, Jean Baptiste Nael, Danielle Nicholas, Meera Subramanian, Daniel F. Zettler
Aprovecho Research Center, July 3, 1996

Good summary on stove efficiency by Aprovecho in 1996.

CO/CO2 Ratio in the Charcoal Stoves Tested at Aprovecho (pdf)
Dean Still, Aprovecho Research Center, June 23, 2006

The following graph plots the levels of CO and CO2 during one test each of the charcoal burning rocket stove and Jiko-type charcoal stove from Ghana. A higher level of CO2 suggests a higher burn rate of fuel.

It can be seen that even though the CO level for the rocket drops below 10 ppm, the CO2 level remains high suggesting a high firepower continues. The Ghana charcoal stove has a lower level of CO2 with a considerably higher level of CO.

Comparing the Charcoal Burning Rocket and Jiko Stoves (pdf)
Dean Still and Nordica MacCarty, Aprovecho Research Center, June 22nd, 2006

The charcoal Rocket Stove was compared to the Jiko-type charcoal stove sent from Ghana. 600 grams of Kingsford charcoal was placed in the stoves under the Aprovecho emissions hood. One test was performed on each stove for preliminary studies. The stoves are compared in the following graph for carbon monoxide emissions during a cooking task (to boil 5L of water and simmer 30 minutes).

Instructional Video "Building a VITA Stove"
Jeremy Roth, Aprovecho Research Center, June 13th 2006

File attachments: 

CO Emissions from a Charcoal Rocket Stove
Dean Still, Aprovecho Research Center, June 12, 2006

CO Emissions From a Charcoal Rocket StoveCO Emissions From a Charcoal Rocket Stove

Pages

Subscribe to Rocket