Mozambique

Maputo Ceramic Stove Update
Crispin Pemberton Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, Swaziland, June 6, 2007
MCSMCS

Jigger Mould Making for the Maputo Ceramic Stove
Crispin Pemberton Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, March 7 2007
[img_assist|nid=1523|title=Finished, cured moulds|desc=|link=node|align=left|width=400|height=387]
This is a set of pictures to show the process for making the moulds. The results are quite impressive - smooth and hard, beautifully formed. We can make about 10 or more moulds per day using the Jigger mould holder as a form.

From Richard Stanley Legacy Foundation to Steve Amodio in Burkina Faso on Presses December 14, 2006
Subject: response to your report on Burkina Faso...

Richard:Steve,
This is in response to your email sent earlier, below in which several issues are presented.

Steve: We set out to build three pressed I had designed during our initial month of talks. We were grossly inefficient in 
spending, but we produced three presses to try out in three villages.

Richard:The press you designed is clever. Thought I'd share a few other designs with you too.

1) A hinged base with a miniature ladder arrangement, the rungs of which provide a multi position pivot for the lever, from Mozambique Keith and Alberto of the SPARK association outside Maputo: Shown is Alberto with bqs in hand lever leaning against cylinder. with mini ladder welded on ot top end of cylinder. I think it hinges at base to open for briquette release.
Contact: ketoooo@fastmail.fm

Vitagoat Steam Boiler
Malnutrition Matters, Ottawa, Canada

Steam boiler: Operates on wood or other solid fuels or liquid gas. Steam-injected pressure -cooking can be 10 times more fuel efficient than traditional open fire cooking and more efficient than improved stove-design cooking. Water is heated in an inner chamber and the resulting steam is re-heated in a tube, creating a “superheated steam” that is much hotter than regular steam. The steam is then fed into the cooker. The boiler is inexpensive to build, safe, and can be taken apart for cleaning, which is critical since most boilers accumulate scale on their inner shells and eventually fail.

Maputo Ceramic Stove Images August 23, 2006
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, August 23, 2006

Crispin has provided us with the following images of his new MCS 200 stove.

MCS 200 Profile ViewMCS 200 Profile View

MCS 200 Top ViewMCS 200 Top View

MCS 200 Top View Grate OutMCS 200 Top View Grate Out

MCS 200 Bottom View No GrateMCS 200 Bottom View No Grate

MCS 200 Bottom View 9 Hole Grate200 Bottom View 8 Web 9 Holes

MCS 200 11 Hole vs 9 HoleMCS 200 11 Hole vs 9 Hole

MCS 200 1150C vs 800CMCS 200 1150C vs 800C

MCS 200 1160 Hold vs 1150MCS 200 1160 Hold vs 1150
MCS 200 - 2 After 2 Hr Test BurnMCS 200 - 2 After 2 Hr Test Burn

Note: Click images to enlarge

Glazed Maputo Ceramic Stove
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, August 23, 2006

Glazed Maputo Ceramic StoveGlazed Maputo Ceramic Stove

Click to enlarge image

Dear Friends

This is a picture of a glazed MCS 200 (200 mm in diameter) which was made this week in Maputo.

The idea is that the stove should not look 'like a ceramic stove' but more like a casserole or a serving dish, something perhaps one would find in a kitchen rather than out in a shed.

First test of the Maputo Ceramic Stove
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, August 20, 2006

MCS200MCS200

Note: click image to enlarge.

Dear Friends

I have completed a test of the first fully formed Maputo Ceramic Stove (MCS) with 3 litres of water and initially a bit more than 300 gm of charcoal. The unit in the pictures is the final version.

The test was done without any skirt or under-tray to improve efficiency, just a pot and lid sitting on a simple stove.

The water boiled in exactly 30 minutes even though the stove body was wet from being washed (oops).

The specific fuel consumption calculated on the basis of water remaining at the time of boiling (good idea) and water remaining at the end of the simmer (something I think is weird) is:

48 gm per litre of water boiled
16.5 gm per litre simmered at 1 degree below the local boiling point for 45 minutes.

This translates into about 324 gm to boil and simmer 5 litres of water, depending on how you calculate it.

The stove was easy to use. I closed the air hole when it boiled and otherwise did not touch anything at any time.

There was more than 140 gm of charcoal left in the stove at the end of the test. This means it had too much in it to begin with. I was unable to get the temperature to drop below almost the boiling point so I think if it was done again with perhaps 200 or 250 gm of fuel it would come out with a better figure.

The stove in the photos will cost about $3 to manufacture profitably. The material is very low thermal expansion PK11 clay mix fired at 1150 degrees. The whole stove weighs 2230 grammes. The material cost about US$0.40. The grate is removable. The two parts can be formed in a manual press like the Ring Maker.

Maputo Ceramic Stove - 2 samples fired differently
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, Swaziland, August 18, 2006

Dear Clay Stove Makers

I am forwarding a photo of two Maputo Ceramic Stoves (MCS) without a grate. One was fired by a thumb-suck method and the other was fired in an oven with a temperature controller.

One of the things I have found is that there is more confidence in the ceramic industry than knowledge.

The two stoves are exactly the same, made from PK11 which is a high feldspar clay, the greater portion being black plastic clay.

You will notice that the darker of the two has a shiny appearance. This is from the melting of the minerals. Looking closely you can see small pock-marks which is where the powdered charcoal burned out (about 10% by weight).

The lighter one is powdery when touched, much lower tone when struck and significantly weaker. The only difference between the two is the firing temperature.

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