Mali

Katene Kadji, is now manufacturing the Sewa Stove in Bamako, Mali.

The new Sewa Improved Charcoal Stove has a ceramic liner, and a painted metal exterior, with jiko style pot rests that put the bottom of the pot low enough to improve heat transfer to the tobt

The carbon finance company E+Carbon is using carbon credits to help Katene Kadji to be able to offer the stoves for 2,500 CFA francs (5.33 USD) as opposed to the original retail price of 3,500 CFA (7.47 USD).

There is a current case study of the Sewa Stove at the Gold Standard web site:
http://www.cdmgoldstandard.org/fileadmin/editors/files/1_case_studies/Mali_Cookstoves_Case_Study.pdf

There's more in the Hedon site:
http://www.hedon.info/View+Article?itemId=10411

Hello stoves community,

At ETHOS 2009 we held a panel on stove safety, bringing in viewpoints from corporate standards development, national standards certification, and small to medium scale developers. The team led by Nathan Johnson (Iowa State University) included Crispin Pemberton-Pigott (New Dawn Engineering), Casper Thijssen (Philips), and Karabi Dutta.

The panel gave a comparative analysis of how different stove industries (multinational corporations, medium-scale companies, NGOs, small developers, etc.) addressed fundamental stove safety questions. These topics included:

a) applicability of standards and regulation;
b) incentives and benefits
c) facilities and equipment availability
d) cost vs. benefit
e) resulting action

We determined that each type of industry has a different perspective that influences their path or actions towards a safer stove. And that all sub-industries may not produce safer stoves given the same incentive mechanisms or policies. As such more than one path to safety may be needed to reach the greatest amount of end-users (and producers). The panel ended the discussion with an overview present work in stove safety with recommendations for next steps.

Please view the attached file for more details. I will be leading a group in 2009 to work on the following: assemble database of injury data, b) analyze incentive mechanisms, cost/ benefit, c) development of lab testing procedures for different stove categories, d) publication of findings/ results, and e) look for partnerships with international agencies to support safer stove design and production.

Please contact me if you have any questions. There will be more updates to follow. Best,
Nathan Johnson
atlas@iastate.edu
PhD Candidate, Mechanical Engineering, International Development
Iowa State University

A Review of the Rural Firewood Market Strategy in West Africa
Gerald Foley (Nordic Consulting Group)Paul Kerkhof (SOS- Sahel)Djibrilla Madougou

GTZ-Projects in the sector of household energy with financial support of DGIS (Dutch Directorate-General for International Cooperation), January 2006

Adidas Alphabounce Boost

Improved Mali Stove
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, New Dawn Engineering, July 21, 2006

Dear Friends

I have heard confirmation from FASEN in Dakar (Senegal) that the women cooking at the ProBEC head office are using 50% less charcoal with their 'improved Malgach' stove (pronounced mal-gash).

Mali_

We know this as the garden variety Mali stove - a very simple metal, inverted, truncated pyramid sitting on a square stand with one side missing attached to a flat, square base. There are millions of them all over Africa.

We added a door to close the open side in the stand, and another truncated, inverted pyramid to the top, creating a counter-flow air preheater. The air now only enters from below when it is being lit. There are two bricks in the base to contain heat from the grate and pass it to the incoming air.

The charcoal is loaded in the usual way and lit. A metal rod bent into a triangle is dropped in and a square sheet with a pot skirt is then dropped on top of everything, closing in the fire. The rod keeps the pot off the charcoal - preferably a 50mm gap.

The fact that the women are putting in 1/2 the charcoal normally used is not the end of the story. The stove is designed for 2 kg of charcoal so putting in 1 kg is leaves empty space. In reality the stove could be reduced in size by 30% in length, breadth and height reducing the material cost to approximately that of the original, larger, more wasteful stove. The gap between the two 'pyramids' is 13 to 16mm.

Mali (Sewa) Stove Used in Polekwane, Limpopo Testing
Crispin Pemberton-Pigott and Rina King, New Dawn Engineering, December 2002


Rina King: A picture of the "Mali Stove" and "Modified Mali Stove" are attached. "They"

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