IDP

A loaded kinyanjui type barrel kiln carbonizing maize cobs
free fuel!
a full kin of maize cob and branch charcoal made in less the a day
the maize cob charcoal cooks with high heat and little smoke.

Four very good reasons why to make your own charcoal from dry maize cobs.

  1. They are FREE!! (minimal processing required and are widely available as a farm waste product)
  2. Maize cob charcoal is very easy to make and leaves few charcoal fines. (no need for expensive briquetting)
  3. They are easy to light and burn very hot with little ash and are perfect for cooking a quick meal.
  4. Using maize cob charcoal means ZERO reliance on tree's and forests, LPG gas or unreliable and expensive electricity supplies for your cooking fuel needs. And with a Cookswell Jiko you can bake, boil, roast and toast all of your favorite foods

Air Jordan VII 7.5 Ture Flight

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Save Money, Save Energy, Eat Well!

Since the introduction of our line of Cookswell Energy Efficient Charcoal Ovens in 1992, thousands of ovens have been sold regionally and countrywide, to all manner of people for all manner of uses.

UNCHR, Refugee Operations and Environmental Management, A Handbook of Selected Lessons Learned from the Field, 2002

Air Jordan 7 Sandals Slippers

Impact Evaluation of the Use of Ethanol with the CleanCook Stove in the Kebribeyah Refuge Camp
Ephrem Hassen, Ethiopian Rural Energy Development and Promotion Center, Ministry of Mines and Energy,Addis Ababa, October 2006
James Murren, Project Gaia/Stokes Consulting Group, March 2008
CleanCook StoveCleanCook Stove

Bonga Narrative Survey Report Bonga UNHCR Resettlement Camp, Ethiopia
Firehiwot Mengesha and Wubshet Tadele, Gaia Association, January 2007

[img_assist|nid=1586|title=Mariam with Cleancook Stove|desc=|link=node|align=left|width=210|height=225]

Indoor Air Pollution Monitoring Summary:The Gaia Association CleanCook Stove Tests
in the Kebribeyah Refugee Camp,Somali Regional State, Ethiopia

Fuel Efficient Stove Programs in IDP Settings - Summary Evaluation Report, Darfur
Academy for Educational Development for USAID, December 2008

1. INTRODUCTION: EVALUATION OBJECTIVES
Around the world, conflict and natural disasters have displaced millions of people. Displaced populations fleeing to settlement camps and seeking safety in host villages often put great stress on natural resources, leading to environmental degradation and conflict with local populations. One of the greatest needs of people affected by crisis, be they displaced, settled, or on the move, is firewood or some other type of fuel to cook their food, heat their homes, and treat water for drinking and food preparation. The risks endured (especially by women and children) collecting scarce wood resources constitute some of the most challenging and serious protection concerns both in IDP camps and in villages where conflict over resources is high.

Fuel Efficient Stove Programs in IDP Settings - Summary Evaluation Report, Uganda
Academy for Educational Development for USAID, September 2007

Introduction: Evaluation Objectives

Around the world, conflict and natural disasters have displaced millions of people. Displaced populations fleeing to settlement camps and seeking safety in host villages often put great stress on natural resources, leading to environmental degradation and conflict with local populations. One of the greatest needs of all people affected by crisis, be they displaced, settled or on the move, is firewood or other types of fuel to heat their homes, cook their food, and treat water for drinking and food preparation. The risks endured (especially by women and children) collecting sometimes scarce wood resources constitute some of the most challenging and serious protection concerns both in IDP camps and in villages where the conflict over resources is high.

USAID’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has been one of the key US Government funders of humanitarian agencies implementing fuel-efficient stove (FES) programs in IDP settings. The FES programs are intended to help the agencies accomplish various goals, such as improve food security or decrease deforestation, by reducing fuel consumption. However, the large number of implementers, their varying motives and degrees of expertise, and differing conditions within and among IDP communities have made it difficult for OFDA to determine the relative efficacy of the FES interventions and provide guidelines for USAID-funded entities working in IDP settings.

Therefore, OFDA enlisted the assistance of the USAID Energy Team to undertake a multi-phase evaluation in order to derive “best practices” for future FES interventions. While the primary purpose of this evaluation is to provide guidance to USAID-funded organizations, USAID hopes to inform the broader humanitarian community by sharing the results of the evaluation with them as well. Eventually, the best practices will be developed into a series of recommendations and toolkits for use by NGOs, donors, and other groups operating FES programs in IDP settings.

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