Kenya

for all your cooking needs,
save energy, cook more food.

Take a look at the Cookswell Web site for more information:
http://www.reskqu.blogspot.com/

Teddy Kinyanjui, Musaki Enterprises, Nairobi, Kenya

For all your domestic cooking needs,

High quality original Kenya Ceramic 'Cookswell' Jikos cookstoves of all sizes shapes and use's.

Save up to 70% on elelctricity/ LPG gas use by switching to biomass charcoal.

see http://www.kenyacharcoal.blogspot.com for more information.

Robert V. Lange, February, 2011

Robert Lange, and the team from the ICSEE has been working in cooperation with the local Maasai leadership to bring both improved cookstoves and improved light and radio access to their people, as well as the training to install and repair their own stoves and PVC systems.

This project does a great job of teaching the women of the Maasai tribes to build their own improved rocket style stoves using local materials, and relatively small sections of steel and rebar to improve the durability of the local ceramic brick. The women are clearly proud of their new stoves, and their ability to repair, and move the stoves as needed, and even better than that - the neighbors are jealous and motivated to learn and build as well.

More information is available on their web site: http://www.maasaistovessolar.org

More information about the project methodology, and other ICSEE Projects can be found on the ICSEE web site:
http://www.the-icsee.org/projects/africa/villageprojects.htm
and the Villages Project web site: http://www.villageprojectsint.org/

The Kitengela Arboretum Promoting sustainable agro-energy technologies and conservation education. Kenya Seeds of Change An initiative contributing towards national afforestation through direct seeding of woodlots. Concept Compiled by: Teddy M. Kinyanjui Sustainability Consultant Kitengela Arboretum Po. Box 23058 Lower Kabete Nairobi, Kenya. April 2009

**Kenya Seeds of Change**
*Overview*
The degraded state of Kenya’s national and private forests (and therefore, the overall environmental health of the country) borders on the point of no return. Unless large scale forestry efforts are undertaken by both the public and private sector in the next few years, the damage that has been done to the countries forests will become irreversible. Due to the slow pace of natural regeneration of forests (as compared to their exploitation), a boost is sorely needed to meet current and future demands by Kenya’s ever growing population for sustainably grown wood by-products, especially the charcoal and firewood that is used daily by 80% of the country’s population.
The Kenya Seeds Of Change initiative aims to contribute towards national afforestaion by land owners through the countrywide sales of inexpensive tree seeds and the promotion of direct seeding woodlot establishment. Seeds are by far the best method of promoting wide scale tree planting in Kenya. These are some of the benefits from the direct planting of tree seeds compared to planting seedlings:

  • Seeds are Cheaper! (At roughly 0.25cents per tree compared to 20+ shillings per seedling)
  • The tree’s hardiness and survivability increases.
  • Thousands of seeds can be transported and stored much more easily then thousands of seedlings can until the planting time comes.
  • Seeds can be massively disseminated through existing retail outlets with minimal price increments from producer to consumer. Tree seedlings face problems of availability at the right time, dissemination logistics etc.
  • Partially domesticated indigenous tree species are best grown from seed. They are already adapted to Kenya’s climate, soils and pests and the trees are currently widely used and understood by the population.
  • Seeds simplify the enhancement of the genetic diversity of planted woodlots.
  • The above/below ground biomass ratio is more conducive to healthy growth when a tree is planted from seed.
  • Overall financial losses and risks from drought, animals etc. are significantly less under direct seeding.

Limited Access to Good Seed

  • From large commercial plantations to small scale rural and urban farmers, the access to purchase certified tree seeds according to their growing zones and uses is extremely limited to anyone who would like to plant trees.
  • Currently the only place to buy graded, certified tree seeds is at KEFRI (The Kenya Forestry Research Institute), located in Muguga, on the outskirts of Nairobi.
  • In contrast all the Nakumatt and Uchumi supermarket chains and all of the Agro-Vets in small or large towns and cities stock a variety of seeds ie. sukuma wiki (Kale) and maize etc.
  • Which of course raises the question; why don’t they all stock small packages of tree seeds that are suited to their market base?

This is what the Kenya Seeds of Change initiative has been started to get done.

USAID, February 2010

Please See the Full Report for details

Introduction to study and tested stoves
The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the potential suitability of a new

A charcoal oven in the kitchen of the Karen Blixen Camp, Maasai Mara.

They use it because it;
a) saves alot of money on buying LPG (fossil fuel)
b) cooks food really really well!

And it only uses a handfull of charcoal thanks to insulation and the ceramic liner!

to buy one please see

www.kenyacharcoal.blogspot.com

we also offer international shipping

The Kenya Seeds Of Change initiative aims to contribute towards national afforestaion by land owners through the countrywide sales of inexpensive tree seeds and the promotion of direct seeding woodlot establishment. Seeds are by far the best method of promoting wide scale tree planting in Kenya. These are some of the benefits from the direct planting of tree seeds compared to planting seedlings;

Save Money, Save Energy, Eat Well!

Since the introduction of our line of Cookswell Energy Efficient Charcoal Ovens in 1992, thousands of ovens have been sold regionally and countrywide, to all manner of people for all manner of uses.

Project Title: Western Gasifier Stove Project
African Christians Organization Net work, Salim Mayeki Shaban, May 10, 2009

AFCON WorkshopAFCON Workshop

APPLICANT

Name of Organization: African Christians Organization Net work
Mailing Address: P.O.BOX 323, BUNGOMA 50200 Kenya
Physical Address: 1 st fl. KCB Building
Telephone: + 254 727 621841
Email: salimshaban2005 at gmail.com
Principal Officer: Salim Mayeki Shaban
Project Contact Person: Salim Mayeki Shaban Programme Coordinator and Everlyne Otunga Program Manager

PROJECT
Focal Area: Reducing indoor air Pollution and forest Conservation
Activity Category: Learning by Doing Project.

Proposed project Duration: Two Years.

FINANCES
Total Mount grants Request: (KSHS) 4,245,429.20 (USD) 62,241.3
Other Contributions (KSHS) 1,520,000.00
Grand Total (KSHS) 5,765,429.20
Exchange Rate kshs 70.00 = I Us$

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.1 GOAL OF THE PROJECT
To promote energy conservation and reduce deforestation in the sugar cane growing in Western Kenya.

.1.2.1 Specific Objectives
To Promote TLUD gasifier cookstoves and five biogas planter in Western Kenya
To provide and service 20,000 TLUD gasifier cookstoves and 5,000 fireless stoves..
To train 150 women and youth groups in production, repair and sale of energy saving equipment
To train schools and communities on energy conservation and use of renewable energy technologies.
To develop an energy equipment workshop for production, service and sale of improved cook stoves and energy saving equipment.

1.3 ACTIVITIES
The activities in the project will be
Community mobilization on energy conservation, forest resource management and effect of indoor air
Training in design, manufacturers and sale of renewable energy equipment and technologies i.e. biogas, TLUD gasifier cookstoves.
Networking on renewable energy conservation i.e. knowledge sharing and information dissemination.
Manufacture TLUD gasifier cookstoves, and five Biogas planters

2.0 STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH PARTNERS
This project will be carried out within the Nile Basin in Western Kenya. The same area is sources of Nile and other small tributaries. The project will promote energy saving culture and lead to sustainable use of forest resources while contributing towards the Kyoto protocol implementation. While noting that firewood is the major source of energy within the Nile basin and Methane, is 20 times more potent CO2 and hence its use in biogas energy is encouraged in managing green house effect.

3.0 PROJECT AREA
Western Kenya has a population of over 5 million people of which 80% depend on agriculture for livelihood and over 70% use firewood as fuel source. A survey has shown that all boarding schools use firewood and charcoal as fuel for cooking hence pressure on forest cover. Sugar cane growing in Mumias, Malava and Bungoma is a heavy user of trees as firewood. This combined has led to heavy exploitation of forests and trees for firewood hence a danger to the water catchments area.

4.0 PROBLEMS/CHALLENGE
Sugar cane cultivation in western Kenya, which started in mid 1970’s, has accelerated the rate of destruction of trees due to high population density has further compounded the problem of destruction of forests and trees hence threatening the very source of water within the Nile Basin. Schools continue to put pressure on forest due to their high demand for firewood to use in cooking with highly inefficient open fire stoves. These project will develop biogas as an alternative source of energy, promote economical use of energy in institutions and homesteads through use of energy saving stoves create employment for people trained in production and service of the same and of the same and efficiently generate and use the highly potent methane from farmlands through biogas plants.

5.0 RATIONALE
This project meets the requirements of MDG's and Partnership for clean indoor air broad objective. The project will support community driven effort and will address environmental threats on local scale within the Nile basin region in the area of development and use of alternative energy and construction materials. In the process of carrying out participatory planning and appraisals for Musamba, Matungu, Kholera and Khalaba, the villagers expressed the desire to get cheap alternative to fuel firewood energy and alternative to open fire 3-stone cooking method. In all this areas, villagers expressed their fears that trees are disappearing and as a result they use farm wastes like maize stalks for firewood. The same should be used to replenish soil fertility after the crop season and should not used in the kitchen as firewood. Others were resorting to cane trash and remnants.

See specific goals and objectives in the attached project document.

AFCONAFCON

Stove by the African Christian Organizations Network
Salim Mayeki Shaban, Programme Coordinator, African Christians Organization Network, January 26, 2008
RowetoRoweto

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