Metal

Laurens Rademakers, Biochar Fund
December, 2009

See the attachment for full sized pictures.

we've designed a new biomass stove that produces char. The stove is a simple hybrid of a rocket stove and a retort. We would be glad if you could upload it to the stoves list, because we want to see what the community thinks of it. It is only a concept, even though we've tested some basic design steps.

We will be testing this design at our large biochar site in Congo, where our project soon kicks off.

World Stove Corp, Italy
October, 2009

LuciaStove for Developing Nations
Lucia StoveLucia Stove

I’ve been following a couple of different groups and discussions to learn about biochar for about 6 months. Id like to share what I’ve been learning and ask a couple of questions.

My purpose is to use biochar as a component in biological soil synthesis and buffer for use in a vaquaculture growing system.

I have been making small TLUD stoves, observing modeling tweaking making another.

Paul Anderson, 2009 SeaChar Stoves Workshop

The efforts at SeaChar (Seattle Biochar Initiative) produced a 5-gallon (22-liter) TLUD.

"On Saturday, August 1, Seachar hosted Dr. Paul Anderson (Dr. TLUD) for an all-day workshop in the construction of Top-Lit Up Draft (TLUD) cookstoves. The stoves can quickly be constructed from commonly available materials, and produce charcoal while providing heat for cooking (or other uses). Paul’s TLUD stoves have been tested and shown to produce very low emissions of CO and particulates. The stoves can provide benefits wherever people rely on biomass for cooking. TLUD stoves use a wide variety of small pieces of biomass for fuel. The clean burn greatly improves indoor air quality compared with open burning and many other types of stoves. In addition, the charcoal can be used as biochar to improve soil fertility, sequester carbon, and potentially provide a source of income through carbon credits."

For More See: http://seachar.org/wordpress/?p=176

The focus was for making biochar, but this size of TLUD will be highly appropriate of institutional-size cookstoves in the developing countries.

File attachments: 

Design and Development of a Natural Draft Biomass Gasifier
R. Krishna Kumar February 28, 2009

Naturl Draft Gasifier - KumarNatural Draft Gasifier - Kumar

N D G - BASICS & PRINCIPLES

  • Operates under the principlle of “ Chimney Effectt ”
  • Natural draft caused by density difference

UNIQUE FEATURES COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL SYSTEMS

  • No blower is required for the operation
  • Automatically takes the required quantity of air for Gasification
  • Convey the Producer Gas formed by Gasification - Naturally
  • Reduced fuel consumption compared to traditional chulas

More detail, schematic pictures and testing information are in the attached pdfs and in the 2004 discussion:
http://www.repp.org/discussiongroups/resources/stoves/kumar/ndg.htm

This is the prototype of Magh series "Magh Utham Woodgas Burner". http://e-maghutham.blogspot.com/ This is a natural draft burner (forced air is optional). Low cost, low weight, easy of operation, easy to collect the biochar by rotating the combustion frame and easy to reload it. As it is can be used for boilers / institutional stoves / domestic cooking / etc. The performance is good. There could be some more improvements in its design to increase its performance. For details and photographs see the link http://e-maghutham.blogspot.com/ . The term "Utham" refers to "Best" which is part of the name of Prof. K. Purushotham Reddy a very well known environmentalist in India.

Magh CM-II natural draft woodgas stove http://e-maghcm-ii.blogspot.com/, it is a very low-cost stove for heating and generating charcoal. It can also be described as a mini-charcoal making metal kiln. Instead of incinerating biomass generated from home gardens / any other dry combustible material generated as household waste usually throw into the garbage bins, can be used here. The leaf litter, dry twigs / sticks, chips of wood, wood shavings, etc., are very much suitable.

Cookstove System Save80
LUSAKA SUSTAINABLE ENERGY PROJECT and COOK STOVE PROJECT KUPANG
Climate Interchange AG,Garching/Munich, Germany, July 2008
Cookstove Save80Cookstove Save80

MJA Biomass Gas Stove
Alexis Belonio, July 23, 2008
MJA Biomass Gas StoveMJA Biomass Gas Stove Burning Coal

Alexis Belonio writes (edited and annotated by Paul Anderson and Tom Miles):

Attached is a picture of my latest coal gasifier stove. This
is the same basic TLUD stove I have for wood charcoal and wood chunks.

For domestic use, I use carbonized coal (or coke) as fuel instead
of the raw coal. Coal can be used for the stove, but we don't want to promote
this as a fuel since it emits poisonous gas. I would prefer to use coal for
industry application where gas can be cleaned before it is released to the
atmosphere.

I provide only a small amount of coal fuel in the gasifier stove, enough
for cooking. This mean that the power output is only small and the
metal I use is a stainless steel.

I ignite the carbonized coal by using a wood charcoal that has been soaked in
kerosene as igniter. [This is a TLUD stove, so ignition is at the top.]

[In the Belonio TLUDs, the fan only blows the primary air. The
secondary air is
pre-heated as it rises naturally between the fuel cylinder and the outer
cylinder, finally exiting into the rising flow of combustible gases.]
The smoke in the coal gasifier I have was eliminated [combusted] by mixing
preheated air with the gas generated from the reactor. I think
there is no need of [forced] mixing the secondary air by creating turbulence
with the combustible gases. Because in that case, you will need a
slightly bigger fan with enough pressure to push the air.
MJ Biomass Gas StoveMJ Biomass Gas Stove

Alexis Belonio
atbelonio@yahoo.com

Coconut fiber Stove, Biomass Shredder and Pelletizer

Alexis Belonio, University of the Phillipines, May, 2008

Cocopeat PelletizerCocopeat Pelletizer

Pages

Subscribe to Metal