FAO Forests and Energy 20 Nov 2007
Special Event

Statements and speeches

AIDUGANDA: Why are these Women Carrying Stoves on their Heads? and Other Images from Uganda and Darfur
Ken Goyer, AidUganda, October 2007

Aiduganda has been installing stoves in Uganda and Darfur. The following are links to images and videos from those activities courtesy of Ken Goyer.

Why are these Women Carrying Stoves on their Heads?

Cooking with the standard pot in Darfur

SixBricks Rocket stoves in Lira Refugee Camps

Hybrid Stove Making Charcoal (YouTube)
Lanny Henson, July 26, 2007

Biomass cooking stove burns wood to charcoal and saves the charcoal. One pound of wood cooks 6 kilos of rice and makes 65 grams of char.


Hybrid Stove Burning Bamboo Pan Cooking


Here is another 3 min video of the Hybrid Stove burning bamboo chips and pan cooking eggs.
Bamboo chips burns well in the Side Supply Burner but the pan only reached medium heat.
The heat from the burner seems to be diffusing and bypassing the pan. Enough heat is being generated by the burner but the pan module lacks focus.
Suggestions to fix pan module?


Exploring Biomass Gasifier Possibilities and Fuels in Central Guatemala
Charlie Sellers, March 7, 2007
See Charlie's

Guatemala wood

34,870 Rocket Mud Stove, Jiko Kisasa and Maendeleo Stoves in Kenya 2006
Anna Ingwe, GTZ Kenya, Private Sector Development in Agriculture (PSDA) and DGIS, February 1, 2007

RMS Stove
RMS Stove

Martin Boll, Germany, November 2005

To all,

interested in blow and draft.

I found a website you possibly don't know. I like to call this stoves

principle: "natural blow by natural draft"

Have a look to the page. It's in French, but there are pictures, simply to understand.


T. B. Reed and Ron Larson

*Presented at the "Developments in Thermochemical Biomass Conversion" Conference, Banff, Canada, 20-24 May, 1996.

Introduction -

A.The Problem

Since the beginning of civilization wood and biomass have been used for cooking. Over 2 billion people cook badly on inefficient wood stoves that waste wood, cause health problems and destroy the forest. Electricity, gas or liquid fuels are preferred for cooking - when they can be obtained, but they depend on having a suitable infrastructure and are often not available in developing countries. In the last few decades, many improved wood stoves have been developed (the Chula, the Hiko, the Maendeleo, the Kuni Mbili, etc.), but the new wood stoves are often more difficult to manufacture, often more heat goes to the stove than to the food, and they do not offer good control of cooking rate. They are not always accepted by the cooks for whom they are developed.[1] Because of the problems of wood cooking, people often cook over charcoal. However, charcoal manufacture is very wasteful of energy and very polluting, so the problems of the wood stove are externalized but not solved.


Gas is preferred for cooking wherever it is available. Gas can be made from wood and biomass in gasifiers developed in this century, but these gasifiers are generally too big for home use. A downdraft stove for domestic cooking is now being manufactured in China.[2] We have developed a new "inverted downdraft gasifier" stove shown in Fig. 1. It operates using only natural convection. The rate of gas production and heating is controlled by the primary air supply to the gasifier. As an option, the gasifier can make charcoal with a 20-25% yield. The wood-gas stove consists of an "inverted downdraft gasifier" (shown in Fig. 2) plus a burner to mix air and gas and burn cleanly (Fig. 3). These sections are discussed below. The stove has been started and operated indoors with no exhaust fans and no odor of burning wood. However, we believe that there is still much work to be done in optimizing the stove for various fuels, adapting it to various cooking situations and developing other uses. For that reason we are publishing our preliminary results and hope that others will help adapt these principles to improve world cooking and wood conservation.

For more information see the Onil Stove web site: http://www.onilstove.com/works.htm


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