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Small gas cooker using pellet biocarbon
Medium gas cooker burning pellet biocarbon
Medium gas cooker with pot and  'Vietnam Magic Fire'
Close up of Medium gas cooker"Vietnam Magic Fire'
pellet biocarbon
Shaped "anthill" biocarbon Briquette

After over 30 years of doing theoretical and experimental research, the authors of this document (Newtech Co., Ltd. in Quy Nhon city, Binh Dinh and Tan My Kim Co., Ltd. in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam), until now, have completed all not only modern but also cheap & user-friendly technology solutions which can help the poor all over the world do cooking by gas generated at their home without buying any drops of liquefied gas.

These technologies solutions can be developed in a country or in a big city or small town in any countries in the world, even it is in America, Europe, Australia and especially in Asia and Africa.

The authors believe that the modern but simple technology solutions stated hereby will start an era of a great revolution in cooking for billions of the poor all over the world and they hope that such technology will satisfy all poor persons.

The authors are very willingly to transfer these technologies to the countries in accordance with the international law in order to be together with such countries to help the poor all over the world.

  2  FUELS FOR  I STOVE:    COCONUT SHELL CHARCOAL  OR  WOOD (IPIL-IPIL) (Leucaena  leuco
In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
Demonstration
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.Air Jordan 3 For Women-024

Now available internationally from www.cookswell.eu (Cookswell Nederlands) - original, handcrafted Kenyan designed energy saving charcoal convection ovens - bake, roast, toast or steam all of your favorite foods using just a tiny handful of charcoal.

Support local Kenyan innovators and a young Dutch businessman and you can save money, save energy and eat well with a Cookswell Oven.

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the Bingka Oven
Bingka Coconut Rice Cakes baked in the Bingka Oven
Torta baked in the Bingka Oven

Attached is my BINGKA OVEN fired by an Eco-Kalan-C using charcoal (oling) made from coconut shells. I have used charcoal as fuel as it burns clean. I have used firewood also but the soot that is formed inside the oven tarnishes the looks of whatever is baked in it. In the Philippines, there are many men and women who use the traditional “hornohan” for their home-based businesses of making bingka (sweet rice cake with coconut), tortas (breads filled or plain) and cakes made of cassava, ube, wheat and sweet rice. In most cases, one does not earn enough to pay for the medical costs of treating illnesses such as cancer, eye and skin infections and lung diseases which result from long term exposure to smoke and intense heat. By reducing fuel consumption and exposure to radiant heat and by removing the smoke from the cooking environment and immediate neighbourhood, the BINGKA OVEN can bring better health and higher living standards to poor families in the Philippines.nike free run 5.0 crimson

ublished on Dec 20, 2013

December 20, 2013

Dear Friends,
A few weeks after Typhoon Bopha (locally Pablo) struck eastern Mindanao in December 2012, I was introduced electronically to a Filipina doing graduate studies in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.. This young Filipina was fundraising for her home province of Davao Oriental in Vancouver but I was only able to contact her after she returned to Saskatoon. When she learned about the Eco-Kalan, she lamented at the thought of "so much rice donated to the typhoon victims but nothing to cook it with". Her lament has echoed in my mind ever since and has made me more determined to bring the Eco-Kalan stoves to victims of disasters wherever possible, not by ourselves, but with other organizations that can provide security, reliable transportation, food, drinking water, clothing and building supplies.

Great half hour television program explaining Rice Hull Gasifier Stoves, and their potential in Vietnam.

It includes a good comparison of different stove types and designs, and interviews with people using the stoves.

Same video, the Vietnamese version:

EQT Support Boost

PBS put together a nice video about the efforts to improve cooking stoves around the world:

There's more information on their web page: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/building-cleaner-cookstoves/

Nancy Hughes and Gustavo Pena were highlighted with StoveTeam International. http://www.stoveteam.org/

Radha with the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves did a nice job outlining development challenges.

And there were a fair number of stoves that were included in the broadcast but not mentioned by name. I saw Envirofit, Burn Design Lab, Prakti and a few others represented. Let me know which ones I missed. :-) at erin@trmiles.com Online Store 100% Genuine Campus Shoes Red Ebay DET454

Find out more about the Eco-Kalan project here: http://www.eco-kalan.com/

February 3, 2014

Dear Friends,
On December 27-28, 2013, the Eco-Kalan Project Team led by Monica Sison and the Philippine Army (302nd Infantry Achiever Brigade in Tanjay, Negros Or.; 303rd Infantry Brigade in Murcia, Negros Occ,; and 62nd Infantry Battalion in Sagay) went on a relief mission to Purok San Pedro Beach in Barangay Old Sagay, Negros Occidental, Philippines*:

a) to distribute relief food supplies and clothing collected by Monica from a Catholic school where she is teaching, the Social Action Team of the Catholic Diocese of Dumaguete, and ONCAN (Oriental Negros Children Advocacy Network); and

b) to train 150 persons in the set up and use of the eco-Kalan from Barangay Old Sagay who were worst hit by Typhoon Haiyan (locally called Yolanda). These trainees would become the demonstrators at eco-Kalan presentations in their barangay in the New Year. Of the 150 persons selected by Barangay Old Sagay officials, only 35 were from Purok San Pedro Beach.

Purok San Pedro Beach is a coastal village where fishing is the main livelihood. It is also the poorest of the typhoon devastated areas in Old Sagay. Since Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) hit the eastern Visayas on November 8, 2013, little aid has reached this purok. The typical relief food package given to a family was 3kg of rice, 2-3 little cans of sardines and 2-3 packs of noodle soup -- a single day's meager provision for a family of 2 adults and 4 little children. Poor families extended the number of days they ate from this food aid by cooking the rice as lugaw -- i.e., rice boiled in lots of water.

Dear Friends,

A few weeks after Typhoon Bopha (locally Pablo) struck eastern Mindanao in December 2012, I was introduced electronically to a young Filipina doing graduate studies in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. She was fundraising for her home province of Davao Oriental in Vancouver but I was only able to contact her after she returned to Saskatoon. When she learned about the Eco-Kalan, she lamented at the thought of "so much rice donated to the typhoon victims but nothing to cook it with". Her lament has echoed in my mind ever since and it has made me more determined to bring the Eco-Kalan stoves to victims of disasters wherever possible, not by ourselves, but with other organizations that can provide security, reliable transportation, food, drinking water, clothing and building supplies.

When Typhoon Haiyan (or Yolanda) made landfall on Leyte on November 8, 2013, we immediately advised the Emergency Response Team at the Negros Oriental Governor's Office; the Department of Social Welfare and Development in Dumaguete; and our main partner, the 302nd Infantry Brigade of the Philippine Army, of the Eco-Kalan Project's interest to join relief missions to typhoon ravaged communities. Tacloban, Leyte and the northern islands of Cebu were quickly saturated with NGOs and security became a problem so our Project accepted the assignment to Cadiz and Sagay on northern Negros Island where little or no aid had been received. The Eco-Kalan team met with local barangay officials for Cadiz Viejo and Lacawon Island and for Old Sagay to assess the needs there and took photos for documentation (see links below). We also made plans for an Eco-Kalan demonstration and distribution of relief food and clothing in Cadiz Viejo for Lacawon and Cadiz typhoon victims on December 7; and later on December 28 for Old Sagay victims to allow time for the reconstruction of a covered area on a school ground. At each Eco-Kalan demonstration, an Emergency Eco-Kalan-C Kitchen is set-up with 10 stoves each.; and 150 householders are trained in the set-up and use of the Eco-Kalan (see demonstration photos below). These trainees will be the demonstrators at the Eco-Kalan presentations on January 11, 2014 for 670 households from Lacawon Island and Cadiz Viejo; and on January 25 for the 500 or more of the 2,082 affected households in Old Sagay, depending on donations we receive. Lacawon Island will be given 5 Eco-Kalan-C to set-up an Emergency Kitchen of their own. The Emergency Eco-Kalan-C Kitchen is an essential and necessary component of our demonstrations and presentations as nothing appeals more to the poor and hungry than the delicious aroma of the food we cook on the stove they are given.

This presentation was put together by A.Phrao, Chiang Mai of the Warm Heart Foundation in Thailand. They are using biochar to attempt to restore fertility to badly degraded mountain soils, and to intensely fertilized mono-cropped soils that have low fertility.

They designed this medium sized TLUD system with the following constraints:
They wanted to design a simple, low-cost biochar burner that:

  • Can be built from locally available materials, preferably recyclables, at little cost;
  • Can be manufactured by local mechanics without
  • training;
  • Can be operated safely and efficiently by a single person;
  • Can use a variety of feed stocks, preferably field waste;
  • Can produce a minimum of 1 ton of biochar per week under normal, unpressured operating conditions.

The solution is pretty ingenious - please take a look at the PDF for all of the details.

The following is quoted from the pdf:
The 6-burner TLUD merry-go-round:
materials list

  • • 1 x children’s playground merry-go-round or equivalent
  • • 6 x 200 litre steel drums
  • • 6 x 60 litre steel drums
  • • 8 x meters 1” OD steel pipe
  • • 6 x meters 1” angle iron
  • • 6 x 3” hinges
  • • Miscellaneous nuts and bolts, welding rods, grinding wheels
  • • Circular grinder, arc welder

System

  • • 6 TLUD burners
  • • 55 kg corn cob load/barrel
  • • 20+ kg biochar output/barrel
  • • 120 kg per burn
  • • Single man can load, light, rotate, load, light, rotate…empty, extinguish, empty, extinguish… all six loads in 1.5 hrs.
  • • Single man can grind full load in 1.5 hrs.
  • • Two full loads per day = 240 kg/day
  • • 6 day week = 1,440 kg/wk
  • • Feed stock requirement = 3,600 kg/wk
  • • Cost: corn cob @ 700 baht/ton ($23.35) or $60/ton biochar if farmer does not have own supply

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