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Biocharproject.org announces the stumpy biochar combination cooker.

Its a tlud its a rocket stove it has many applications and fully customisable.
Simple design utilises waste LPG tanks to provide safe efficent cheap cooking.

Designed and Made in Australia by Biochar Project and Labrador Mens shed.

See the complete story on http://biocharproject.org

Open source free design

Alex English, January 2012

Stovers,
Its a long winter, and old bones and cord wood and Crispin make me
think......

Attached are two pictures which show my early steps towards
understanding the limitations of gravity with stoves.
One shows a wedge shaped door spacer "the Artful Dodger' which picks the stove's pocket for draft and connect it to any burner idea I can cobble together.

The other shows it operating with a burner that has a small unsealed
hopper for pellets. I use a loose lid/follower to ride down on the
pellets. So far there has been no fumes coming up and out, and the fire has not chased the air and fuel back into the hopper. The bottom throat on the hopper is about 5 cm diameter. It operates continuously at one speed with an input of 1.6 kg of wood pellet per hour.

For a video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOlu7DdX1gI&feature=youtu.be

From GEO CAMP FIRE STOVE

This a low cost simple tin can of less $ 0.5 , with primary and secondary air facility to use for efficient camp fires and also for cooking on it. One need to strive for using the best and efficient stoves, but for the poor, and unavoidable situation / emergencies, such simple tools can be used.
This design is incidental, I have prepared lots of tin cans for Magh CL stove http://e-mcl.blogspot.com/, this winter it had been too cold, during the nights for warmth these tins were used, the efficiency was very high as compared to the open campfires and it was comfortable to use it everywhere. The primary and secondary air helped in complete combustion. Using it for cooking from camp fire mode was also convenient, by just putting on top a concentrator slab and pot rest. During cooking the fuel was fed from the side openings. The wood fed is vertical to slant, this helped in convenient combustion. While cooking was done the radiation of heat was enough for warmth.

I learned to make TLUDs from Dr. Paul Anderson when he came to do a stove & biochar demonstration for Biochar Ontario in June 2009. Since my primary interest was in producing biochar, I went home and began building a larger version of the “Champion” TLUD stove from a 55 gallon drum and a 25 gallon drum (pictured above.) I have been following this list since then and on “Dr. TLUD’s” urging, I thought should begin sharing with this community what I have been learning.

The “Large TLUD”

Essentially a "beefed up" version of the Champion TLUD Stove, my large TLUD has worked beautifully from the first trial run. The pyrolysis process is extremely clean in terms of visible emissions and can produce 25 – 30 liters (6 – 8 gallons) of biochar per run depending on feedstock. To halt the pyrolysis process to retain the biochar I have always used a watering can to quench the glowing coals. Two to four gallons of water usually does the trick.

Using this stove, I have pyrolyzed a number of different types of feedstock including: scraps of spruce lumber, pine needles, pine cones, pine bark, corn cobs, chicken litter, and hardwood sawdust pellets. The successful pyrolysis of the various feedstock has always depended on (no surprise here) having dry feedstock with pyrolysis times ranging from one to two + hours (again, depending on feedstock.)

Until recently I had been using a hardware store woodstove thermometer on the top of the stove.
I estimated pyroloysis temperatures to be in the 350-450 C range. I began using a 12vdc computer cooling fan to shorten run times and boost temperatures closer to 500 C. I recently acquired a temperature data logger and found, to my surprise, that temperature quickly shot to over 800 C with the fan. Even without the fan, temperatures in and above the pyrolysis front were between 600 and 750 C. The data from the first run with the data logger is attached. *Note:T1 is the thermocouple near the top of the inner fuel barrel just below the top of the feedstck and T2 is the thermocouple about 2 inches above the bottom of the inner fuel barrel.

My next steps are to monitor temperatures while experimenting with choking the primary air to different degrees and as I gain better control of pyrolysis temperatures, to (further) experiment with various types of feedstock. I am also working on a simple system to use the pyrolysis heat to dry feedstock.
I will post my results here.

tuumbenkooben.wordpress.com/

Desarrollando la estufa Túumben  K´óoben, una estufa adecuada a las condiciones culturales y ambientales de la Peninsula De Yucatan

This Rocket Stove that is made from 4 cans and can be made by anyone with metal clippers. The efficiency of this stove surpasses any other rocket stove because it heats an unlimited supply of hot water at the same time that it cooks over the fire. Sound to good to be true? Check it out! Here is the link to the YouTube videos. May the world be blessed and thank God for this gift.

http://www.youtube.com/Littlechristgod

As the United States biomass thermal and power industry continues to expand, new reliable technologies offering higher efficiency solutions must be introduced. The newly introduced EOS series biomass gasification boiler is among the most energy efficient of AESI’s high-performance, low-maintenance biomass energy plants. The EOS series provides thermal outputs ranging from 600,000 BTU/hr to 20 million BTU/hr, and can be staged to provide increased capacity.

Designed and built by the leaders in the biomass waste to energy market in Europe, Uniconfort, the EOS series builds upon over 50 years of experience and over 4000 successful installations throughout the world. When asked about the highly efficient EOS series, CEO of Uniconfort Davis Zinetti notes, “we must not forget that greater efficiency is associated with less CO2 production. Choosing EOS, therefore, means making a choice in favor of the environment.”

Report on Improved Dung Burning Stove in Tibet
Mike Hatfield, Aprovecho Research Center and GTZ, July 16-August 4, 2006

Tibet Traditional StoveTibet Traditional Stove

Boiler Stove Idea
Frans Peeters, July 25, 2006

Designing Improved Wood Burning Heating Stoves (2 MB) Dean Still, Aprovecho, October 2005
Air Zoom Vomero 14

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