Black carbon

  2  FUELS FOR  I STOVE:    COCONUT SHELL CHARCOAL  OR  WOOD (IPIL-IPIL) (Leucaena  leuco
In operation with Wood Fuel and Charcoal
Similar product quality
different emissions
Demonstration
One of the ovens in use.

Eco-Kalan has adapted their Binkga Oven (named ofter the rice cakes that the ovens make) to use both locally available coconut charcoal and stick wood fuel.

The system uses the same oven bottom, and two different covers, one for wood and one for charcoal. Both ovens can bake high quality Bingka rice cakes, but with two different levels of particulate emissions. (Notice the soot on the wood fired oven). However, both ovens are cleaner than the hornohan stove that Eco-Kalan would like to replace.

The Bingka Oven works over a range of cooking temperatures (325 deg. F - 500 deg F) and has can cook both bingka and torta breads (with or without filling). Rebecca is anticipating that it will also work for a wide variety of other baked goods.

They have demonstrated the oven for local parents, teachers, government officials, and others. They have also reached out to people who work with remote communities that in the mountains. The first commercial production will target bakers who are preparing the bingka and torta on the more common and smokey hornohan stoves and anticipate the newer stove will give these bakers the ability to make high quality goods with lower costs and improved health.

See the attached files for details.

A couple of the presentations from the ASEAN-US NEXT-GENERATION COOK STOVE WORKSHOP, November 19, 2009.

One is a great study by Dr. Modi of Columbia University of several stoves in Tanzania, and the other is some useful info from Tami Bond. Kirk also gave a very useful presentation, but unfortunately it was not included in the proceedings.

New Princeton Report on Climate Impacts of Black Carbon

Princeton University has just published Black Carbon: A Review and Policy Recommendations and Frank Norcross (one of the authors) sent me an early but final copy – you’ll recognize that many of the people acknowledged are from our stove community, with Tami Bonds contributing very obviously throughout. The report ascribes 18% of black carbon (BC) emissions to residential biomass burning (inefficient home coal and petroleum stoves add additionally?), and differentiates between combustion processes’ “organic carbon” and “black carbon” (à la Tami’s and Chris Roden’s presentations at ETHOS) – contained burning has the potential for climate warming via BC while open burning (of forests and savannas) may induce cooling effects because the organic carbon particles scatter sunlight.

Appropriately, the recommendations for reducing the impacts of stoves (Chapter 4) includes the implementation of more efficient ones, with better interventions and monitoring to increase acceptance rates, and clearly demonstrate that they are being used as they are designed to be; as usual we have out job cut out for us. Biochar is discussed as well, as a mitigation measure – assuming that charcoal product is “clean” I expect. Whatever your opinion of the possible present/future impacts of we multiplying humans on climate change, this is excellent reading and a good review of the present knowledge as it pertains stovers.

 

Figure 1: The second column represents the estimated total contribution (in oC) to global warming since 1750 of BC-containing soot particle; data included through 2006, Jacobson 2004)Figure 1: The second column represents the estimated total contribution (in oC) to global warming since 1750 of BC-containing soot particle; data included through 2006, Jacobson 2004)
Figure 2: Global breakdown of BC emissions by source (adapted from Bond et al, 2004)Figure 2: Global breakdown of BC emissions by source (adapted from Bond et al, 2004)
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