Testing of EverythingNice stove in Cambodia 30.04.2010

Testing of the EverythingNice in Cambodia 30.04.2010
Sarah Carter and Vichida Tan, UK Biochar Research Centre

See http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-andersons-tl for a similar test on Anderson's TLUD and http://www.bioenergylists.org/content/testing-anila-stove for tests on the Anila stove.

**Stove**: Everythingnice from WorldStoves. Produced by the Iron Workshop, Siem Reap, Cambodia (http://www.theironworkshop.org/).
**Test**: A water boiling test (time to boil 5 litres of water, in a pan without a lid)
**Location**: The Iron Workshop, Siem Reap. A well ventilated building – 2 surrounding walls, and a roof. Wind conditions were low.

**Test 1**. Cold start
**Feedstock**: 400g dry small sticks varying sizes between 5mm and 1.5cm diameter and 2cm and 10cm length. This (loosely packed) filled up the inner chamber to 2cm from the top.
**Ignition**: a very small amount of gasoline used
**Water boiling**: initial temperature 28oC after 16 minutes (including 6 mins for relighting fire) reached 37oC
**Burn**: Total burn time of 30 minutes, but the fire went out twice, for a total of approximately 6 minutes (pot stand height too low, see comment later). Smoky burn at times.
**Biochar production**: Total end weight 100g, however not all the wood had been charred.

**Test 2**. Hot start (the stove was not allowed to cool down before the next test began).
**Feedstock**: 1200g wood chunks approximately 2cm x 2xm x 10cm (all that could fit in).
**Ignition**: as test 1.
**Water boiling**: initial temperature 28oC. Pan on fire for 42 minutes, reached 88oC, but pan deemed too high to achieve boil.
**Burn**: Total burn time of 60 minutes. Strong flame, smokeless.
**Biochar production**: 300g

**Test 3**. Hot start (the stove was not allowed to cool down before the next test began).
**Feedstock**: 1100g wood chunks approximately 2cm x 2xm x 10cm (all that could fit in).
**Ignition**: as test 1.
**Water boiling**: initial temperature 28oC. Pan on fire for 25 minutes, and reached 95oC, but pan deemed too high to achieve boil.
**Burn**: Total burn time of 35 minutes. Strong flame, smokeless.
**Biochar production**: 300g

**Test 4**. Hot start (the stove was not allowed to cool down before the next test began).
**Feedstock**: 600g dry small sticks varying sizes between 5mm and 1.5cm diameter and 2cm and 10cm length. This (medium tightly packed) filled up the inner chamber to 2cm from the top.
**Ignition**: as test 1.
**Water boiling**: initial temperature 28oC. Pan on fire for 30 minutes, and reached 70oC, after 26 minutes pan was moved lower to stove which saw a faster increase in temperature.
**Burn**: Total burn time of 34 minutes. Fire went out for around 4 minutes, and some gasoline was used to relight. Generally strong flame, smokeless.
**Biochar production**: 100g

**General comments**:
Wood pieces were quite large so difficult to pack into the stove (other tests have used about 1/3 more wood) so wood will be chopped smaller for further tests, which should lead to a longer burn time.
Initially the pan was held on a stand about 1.5cm from the top of the stove. The flame had a tendency to go out, so after persevering for about 10 minutes raising it up to 7cm was tried. This seemed to however because it failed to boil the water (during test 2 and 3 which was an expected outcom) this was deemed too high (especially when it became more windy), and a compromise of about 3cm was tested at the end and seemed to be most efficient.
Further tests will be carried out with this new pot stand height. Thinking aloud, 5l of water is a lot of water, perhaps not the best to replicate the amount of water required when cooking at the household level. Using 3 or 4 litres may make boiling water more reliable, and therefore produce better test results.
Does anyone have any comments on this?

Sarah carter
UK Biochar Research Centre
http://biocharinnovation.wordpress.com/Nike EPIC React Flyknit