Can the woodfuel supply in sub-Saharan Africa be sustainable? The case of N’Djaména, Chad

Can the woodfuel supply in sub-Saharan Africa be sustainable? The case of N’Djaména, Chad
Robert J. van der Plas, and Mahamat Ali Abdel-Hamid1 Brem 68, Oldenzaal 7577 EW, The Netherlands
AEDE (l’Agence pour l’Energie Domestique et l’Environnement).

Available online 24 September 2003.
Energy Policy Volume 33, Issue 3 , February 2005, Pages 297-306

Abstract
Chad, like many other sub-Saharan African countries, depends for most of its energy demand on woodfuels; 90% or more of the country's energy balance comes from biomass energy. Obvious environmental problems appear around cities because of their highly concentrated demand, and this threatens the sustainability of supply. But, this does not need to be a problem, and woodfuel can also be an engine of economic growth, particularly in rural areas. A few policy conditions will need to be satisfied and in Chad this appears to be the case. As a result, the woodfuel supply of the capital N’Djaména could become sustainable, thereby continuing to provide low-cost energy to the urban population for the foreseeable future while giving income generation opportunities in rural areas. A win–win situation?!